Worthy

By Evan Ryan Ringler

Worthy: A Weekly Reset #020 - What I've Learned During a World Pandemic (Part 2)

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November 29 · Issue #20 · View online
Worthy
Part 2/2 of what I’ve learned during COVID-19.
What has this year brought for you? How has your perspective shifted? How have your frameworks been deconstructed? How do you see things now?
I would love to hear how your perspective has changed this year, what you’ve been learning. How cool is it that we can learn from one another’s experiences and perspectives? What a privilege.
You are worthy!
— Evan
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WHAT I'VE LEARNED FROM COVID-19
We follow the rules when it’s convenient.
We’ve all been here at least ten times this year: you get a phone call from your friend who lives in Birmingham, the summary of the call goes like this: “What virus?” An hour later, you’re reading how mayors and governors asked their respective cities to shut down, to not see anyone other than the people you live with. *4 hours later* you read of their travel plans to visit family across the country via plane.
When it makes sense, or works for us, we tend to follow the rules. We like to pick and choose what suits us. I’ve seen it countless times this year: someone is quick with the “shoulds:” you should get tested, you should go through tracing, you should quarantine for 47 days. And then that same person dishing out the “shoulds” comes and goes as they please.
It is hypocritical and divisive. How can we be respectful to one another during this time of uncertainty and unknowns? How can we keep each other safe? How can we first see our own shortcomings before seeing the shortcomings of others? In what ways am I being disrespectful during this time? Maybe I’m not even aware I’m being disrespectful?
We have equated ‘evil’ with ‘the other.’
Anyone who doesn’t agree with us is automatically against us. Where did this way of thinking come from? Just because you view something differently than I do, doesn’t mean you are fighting against me or, worse, objectively wrong.
Could it be, that person’s experience has largely played into the way they view and see the world?
Hating ‘the other’ will only produce deeper and further division. What if we strove to love ‘the other?’ What if we weren’t so dualistic in our thinking? So black and white?
In what ways have you demonized ‘the other’ this year? In what ways have you felt set aside because of your own views?
Stay the Course
All we can control in life are our thoughts and actions. How do we bring our best selves to the day?
“An open mind is not an empty one.” - Roger Fisher
How can we be humble and gentle with one another?
Let’s strive to recognize and address our own shortcomings first. Let’s hold space for everyone – especially those who don’t think exactly like us.
Your convictions are not your identity. When we attach them to our feelings is when we feel attacked by ‘the other.’ We can hold our core beliefs and not feel threatened when we lead with love first.
Let’s hold postures that say “I could be wrong here but, how I see it right now is…”
Stay Curious
What are you learning? How do we hold postures that hear?
Look with the Eyes of Compassion, Fr. Richard Rohr, OFM
Stay Light
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