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Work Futures Daily - Happy Holidays!

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Workers Ghosting | Learning From Mining AVs | Predictim Regroups | Trello Buys Butler | Google’s ‘Two
 

Work Futures

December 17 · Issue #1049 · View online
The ecology of work, and the anthropology of the future.

Workers Ghosting | Learning From Mining AVs | Predictim Regroups | Trello Buys Butler | Google’s ‘Two-tier’ Workforce | The Politics of Timber Work | Why Do We Conceal Our Salaries? | Robert Litin’s Report on Automation | Women at Work

Beacon NY - 2018-12-17 — I will be making some changes at Work Futures.
First, I will be slenderizing the Daily, trimming the verbiage from the Links, and dropping the Recent Issues and From the Archives section. The goal is to make the Daily faster to read. So, for example, in the first story below, you would have read this if I had posted it last week:
Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates | Danielle Paquette reports on the growing trend of workers ghosting on their jobs: they simply stop coming to work, quitting without actually saying so.
‘Recruiters at global staffing firm Robert Half have noticed a “ten to twenty percent increase” in ghosting over the past year, D.C. district president Josh Howarth said.
Applicants blow off interviews. New hires turn into no-shows. Workers leave one evening and never return.’
This is the other end of the increase in precarity that workers have experienced for decades. Now that labor is tight, and work is (relatively) easy to find, people simply ghost: why fill out paperwork and go through 'out processing’?
In the new model, starting with this issue, it would read
Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates | Danielle Paquette reports on the growing trend of workers ghosting on their jobs: they simply stop coming to work, quitting without actually saying so. (More commentary: Ghosting A Job? Why Not?)
The 'more commentary’ indicates that I’ve written more on the topic, probably in a post on workfutures.org or stoweboyd.com. Many times I may have no additional commentary: it’s supposed to save time for me too. (Wink).
The second change is coming in January: a paid membership to gain access to new investigative material. Starting in early 2019, I will be launching two investigative series at Work Futures:
  • Work Talk is a planned interview series, where we will talk with thinkers, practitioners, authors, and makers, leaders in the realm of organizational change and new ways of work. I expect two or more Work Talk pieces per month.
  • Work Walk takes an investigative approach to the future of work, ranging from company visits, product demos, book reviews, and original and secondary research. I plan at least one Work Walk piece per month.
Members will also receive discounts to other events, reports, and activities. I hope to turn these projects into podcasts at some point. More to follow on that.
Finally, I have changed the URL of the newsletter at Revue to newsletter.workfutures.org. Should be easier to find.
I’m shutting down operations for the holidays at Work Futures Daily after this issue, 17 December, restarting on 3 January 2019. Happy and Merry!
Please send pointers on things I should be reviewing. You can reply to the newsletter in your inbox and it comes to me, or email me directly.
If you’re getting this you probably signed up at workfutures.org (or one of its predecessors) or stoweboyd.com. If someone forwarded this to you, sign up here.
Consider making a donation. We appreciate your support.
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Work Futures reader and fellow writer on the future of work, Paul Millerd, has recently completed a course that pulls together all of the lessons, secrets and tools he learned while a strategy consultant at firms like McKinsey and Boston Consulting Group for almost ten years. He is offering the course on a gift basis where you can pay-what-feels-right. Check out a preview of some of the lectures here.
Links
Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates | Danielle Paquette reports on the growing trend of workers ghosting on their jobs: they simply stop coming to work, quitting without actually saying so. (More commentary: Ghosting A Job? Why Not?)
What passenger and industrial AVs can learn from each other | Bibhrajit Halder discusses the safety record of Caterpillar and other autonomous truck manufacturers, and points one one central point that might be forgotten: autonomous trucks have been used in mining for years, with no deaths. (More commentary: Learning From Mining AVs: Learn To Dance With The Robots.)
Controversial AI Service for Flagging ‘Risky’ Babysitters Hits Pause After Backlash | I wrote about Predictim’s babysitter filter recently. The backlash is so intense they are hitting the reset button..
Trello Acquires Butler To Bring You The Power Of Automation | Trello acquires Butler, which had provided a business process automation 'power up’ and Trello wants to build that into the basic toolset. Sounds interesting.
Revealed: Google’s 'two-tier’ workforce training document | Julia Carrie Wong reports on more evidence emerging about the profound division at Google regarding the differential treatment of full-time employees (50.05% of the workforce) versus contractors (49.95%). Google may be confronted by the same legal challenges that Microsoft had in the '90s with 'permatemps’.
Quartz’s Efrat Livni has a piece on this, too.
The changing politics of woods work (The politics of timber work) | Hal Herring lays out the history of 'woods work’ – the independent cooperatives of woods workers who planted trees and fought fires in the Northwest forests, and how everything has changed. Fascinating, but sad to see the end of the cooperatives.
Why do we still keep schtum about our salaries? | Jo Ellison in a post about pay transparency shared this factoid:
National Jealousy Day, which falls on November 1 every year, the Finnish tax administration releases details of every citizen’s taxable income in compliance with that government’s transparency laws.
How to adjust to automation | I am deep into Robert Litin’s report, and will likely write something about it soon, but I thought I’d share today because my comments are likely to come after the holidays.
Two pieces about women at work: in Where Are All the Female Architects? | Allison Arieff wonders 'Nearly half of architecture students are women. Why are so few sticking with the industry after graduation?’; and in As Labor Market Tightens, Women Are Moving Into Male-Dominated Jobs | Jed Kolko and Claire Cain Miller discover 'Widening opportunities do not automatically translate into better pay or a decline in gender discrimination’.
Quote of the Day
The urgent question of our time is whether we can make change our friend and not our enemy.
Bill Clinton
crossposted from workfutures.org.
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