View profile

What's on Weibo - Weibo's Moral Compass

Revue
 
It is a week of controversies in which Weibo discussions are arguably more about moral compasses than
 
August 30 · Issue #41 · View online
What's on Weibo
It is a week of controversies in which Weibo discussions are arguably more about moral compasses than the stories themselves.
The first story that is exploding on Weibo over the past two days (670 million views now!) is that about a road-rage incident in Kunshan. When a BMW collided with a bike, the BMW driver stormed out to attack the cyclist and grabbed a knife from his car to stab him. When he accidentally dropped the knife, the cyclist took it and stabbed his attacker instead, eventually killing him. The big question is: is this kind of ‘self-defence’ legitimate? Can the cyclist be held responsible for killing his attacker? Check out the video capturing the initial attack and read all about it here.
The second story that is top trending on Chinese social media this week, involves a female doctor from Deyang who became the target of an online manhunt last week, after a conflict involving a 13-year-old in a local swimming pool went viral on WeChat and Weibo. The impact of the viral manhunt had such an impact on the doctor, that she committed suicide just days after the story took off. Netizens now say the mother of the 13-year-old boy intentionally misguided public opinion and instigated the online witch hunt. In short: social media was used as a weapon in a personal conflict, and it eventually ended up killing someone. Who is to blame, many wonder: the mother, the media, the netizens participating? Read here.
What’s on Weibo was first in reporting both of these breaking stories in English - if you want to get updates on our latest posts, we now have a notification button you can subscribe to (in right corner of screen on www.whatsonweibo.com) so you get notifications on desktop or android about new posts (usually not more than 1-2 per day).
But there were more stories this week, such as the shocking Didi murder or the case in which a child was abducted and rescued hours later - her hair already shaved off and clothes changed.
As for more positive news: What’s on Weibo summer intern Luca de Boni has done a very insightful article on China’s rising electronic dance music scene, and Gabi Verberg, who has just joined What’s on Weibo, has written about the must-follow Chinese female rappers of this moment. Beijinger Miranda Barnes, already a year-long active What’s on Weibo contributor, is soon about to start her travels throughout China together with partner Richard Barnes. On www.abearandapig.com, they write about their travels around the world.
Best,
Manya Koetse (editor-in-chief @whatsonweibo).

Victim of Violence or Rage-driven Killer? BMW Owner Attacking a Bike Driver Stabbed to Death with Own Knife
'Human Flesh Search Engine' over Swimming Pool Conflict Turns Fatal: Female Doctor Commits Suicide after Becoming Target of Online Witch Hunt
The Women Changing the Chinese Rap Scene: Top 3 Most Popular Female Rappers of China The Women Changing the Chinese Rap Scene: Top 3 Most Popular Female Rappers of China
The Rise of China’s Electronic Dance Music Scene: From Underground Culture to Online Communities
Big Changes Ahead?! Draft of China's Civil Code No Longer Includes "Family Planning"
5-Year-Old Girl Goes Missing in Yunnan, Is Found 9 Hours Later with Shaved Head and Changed Clothes
More Details Emerge: Didi Killer Took 9000 RMB from Victim Before Murder | What's on Weibo
Did you enjoy this issue?
If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue