🦉 10x curiosity - John Adair and Action Centred Leadership model

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🦉 10x curiosity

February 20 · Issue #245 · View online

🦉 A weekly sample of links that made me think 🤔


Thinking….
There are countless resources and models of leadership theory and whilst you need to find your own path in the world, it is helpful to stand on the shoulders of others rather than relearning centuries of leadership lessons. I enjoy reading these resources and seeing different threads of leadership action pulled together. I often find that different leadership points of view differ from my own and enjoy being challenged about the “best” way to create change in the world.
John Adair is a prolific author on business leadership. His Action Centred Leadership model is one I have found to be very accessible and comprehensive. This model is represented by Adair’s ‘three circles’ diagram, which illustrates his three core management responsibilities:
  • achieving the task
  • managing the team or group
  • managing individuals

John Adair leadership model
John Adair leadership model
These three tasks are mutually dependent, as well as being separately essential to the overall leadership role.
Beyond these three core tasks, Adair set out these core functions of leadership and says they are vital to the Action Centered Leadership model:
  • Planning - seeking information, defining tasks, setting aims
  • Initiating - briefing, task allocation, setting standards
  • Controlling - maintaining standards, ensuring progress, ongoing decision-making
  • Supporting - individuals’ contributions, encouraging, team spirit, reconciling, morale
  • Informing - clarifying tasks and plans, updating, receiving feedback and interpreting
  • Evaluating - feasibility of ideas, performance, enabling self assessment
The Action Centred Leadership model therefore does not stand alone, it must be part of an integrated approach to managing and leading, and also which should include a strong emphasis on applying these principles through training.
Adair also promotes a ‘50:50 rule’ which he applies to various situations involving two possible influencers, e.g the view that 50% of motivation lies with the individual and 50% comes from external factors, among them leadership from another. This contradicts most of the motivation gurus who assert that most motivation is from within the individual. He also suggests that 50% of team building success comes from the team and 50% from the leader.
Adair further defines the sub roles of a leader within each of the overlapping circles in his book compilation “The John Adair lexicon of leadership - the definitive guide to leadership skills and knowledge
John Adairs leadership sub roles (adapted)
John Adairs leadership sub roles (adapted)
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Links that made me think....
The DIY Scientist, the Olympian, and the Mutated Gene — ProPublica
The myopia of metrics - Cognitive Edge
Nicky Case: Seeing Whole Systems - The Long Now
National Geographic Travel photo winners
National Geographic Travel photo winners
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