The Journal of Struggling Scientists - Issue #3

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The Journal of Struggling Scientists - Issue #3
By The Struggling Scientists • Issue #3 • View online
Welcome to the 3rd installment of The Journal of Struggling Scientists!
I continue to be surprised that more and more people are subscribing to read every issue and it continues to be a pleasure to write and share these.
Just a friendly reminder to check your spam folder at the end of every month as Newsletters often end up there!

🔦 TSS Highlights:
TLDR list:
  • My paper got accepted in Diabetologia 🥳🥳🥳
  • Our Webshop is open to the US now 🥳👕☕️!!!!
  • The store has its very first customizable product🤯!!
  • Suzanne went to Milan for the EAS conference 🎙️🤓
My paper got accepted in Diabetologia 🥳🥳🥳
Yes, you read that correctly my paper got accepted! I have been working on this paper since the start of my PhD and it’s a massive relief that it’s finally accepted.
So many setbacks with this project but we finally got it across the finish line (About F*cking time😅).
All thanks to the amazing co-authors on this paper and especially thanks to Maria because this paper would not be possible without her.
Unfortunately isn’t available online yet so I can’t share it just yet but stay tuned cuz as soon as it’s out you can bet I will let you know!
Our Webshop is open to the US now 🥳👕☕️!!!!
Our elite team of E-commerce developers (Suzanne) has done the impossible and figured out the tax system in the US 🤯!
Okay, but on a more serious note, this is really amazing as this means that The Struggling Scientists Merch is also available now in the US!
Feel free to check out the store if you haven’t already and we hope you find something you like.
The store has its very first customizable product🤯!!
I’m not going to lie cuz this is very cool. We kept getting comments from colleagues that it would be cool if they could customize the shirt.
Well, that’s what we did! You are now able to add a name to the shirt below!
The "It's Doctor Now"Shirt
The "It's Doctor Now"Shirt
Suzanne went to Milan for the EAS conference 🎙️🤓
In addition to everything, she does for the podcast and webshop she also went to present her work at the EAS conference in Milan Italy!
She gave a presentation on her newly discovered gene FALL and everything it does!
More info will follow when the paper gets published of course!
🤯 Mental Health: The Gap and the Gain
“The way to measure your progress is backward against where you started, not against your ideal.” —Dan Sullivan”
Just to be clear we are not being sponsored to promote this book by Dan Sullivan and Dr. Benjamin Hardy (Wish we were though😅).
I found the general concept of this book helpful when I was dealing with feelings of inadequacy regarding my work, relationships, and results in general.
As a PhD student, I was continuously feeling like I wasn’t good enough, I wasn’t doing enough, and discounted all my past achievements while focussing on the things that had yet to be achieved or that were taking longer than I thought they should.
This got so bad that I felt that I was incapable of doing anything right and was the deepest point in my mental health last year. That’s when along with getting therapy, I encountered The Gap and the Gain.
The idea of the gap and the gain helped me actively rephrase my progress as actual progress/ wins (gains) instead of failures to meet a deadline or hit a specific target (the gap).
When we measure our results or achievements there are generally two ways to evaluate them.
One is common for many people and that is to determine ahead of time what we expect and measure our results against our goals or ideals.
The other way to measure is backward.
Example: you have a deadline in 1 month. Every day you work a bit on the project, but despite not finishing it within the deadline you do manage to finish it with a few days delay and didn’t beat yourself up about it along the way.
The benefit of this way is that you get to enjoy the days that you make progress vs lamenting the days where little to no progress was made.
While neither way will change the task, they will change how you perceive the task and affect your mental health in the long run.
So, ask yourself. Would I rather measure my progress against a goal/ ideal and delay my gratification until actually achieving the thing (the gap), or would I rather be happy every day that I make progress towards that goal (the gain)?
If you’re interested in learning more about the gap and the gain then consider buying the book on amazon. I have the audiobook myself which comes with in-between chapters where the 2 authors discuss each chapter which is definitely an added value.
If you are like me and quite stingy with your money and would rather get more of a taste for it then consider checking out The Modern Wisdom podcast where the host Chris Williamson interviews Dr. Ben Hardy about the book and the concepts in it ( link below).
A High Achievers' Guide To Happiness - Dr Benjamin Hardy | Modern Wisdom Podcast 397
A High Achievers' Guide To Happiness - Dr Benjamin Hardy | Modern Wisdom Podcast 397
⚒️Tools & Resources: Zotero
As PhD students/academics we all know writing and reading are extremely important. This is why any tool that helps you keep track of your references is amazing.
That being said, while there are several reference managers out there, one that really stands out to me is Zotero.
Zotero is free to install, use, and is open source. The fact that it is open source brings with it numerous benefits.
These include the fact that Zotero is easy to integrate with many of the most commonly used writing applications such as MS Word and google docs especially.
Additionally, it has many if not all the features you’d expect of a great reference manager like Mendeley but is even more versatile.
I’ve been using it to keep track of the references in my Thesis and so far it has been working very smoothly.
There is something to be said when a tool just works seamlessly and reduces any friction and that is what I feel with Zotero vs something like Mendeley for example.
I would definitely recommend giving Zotero a try if you are considering a reference manager for your next big writing task.
It also pairs up nicely with something like Research Rabbit if you’re into that!
😎Cool Science: transgenerational biology
I recently came across this TEDx talk by the awesome Oded Rechavi on transgenerational biology and passing on traits and memories in C. elegans through using small RNAs.
This was absolutely mind-blowing for me as I had no idea whatsoever that this was a thing but did know about The Dutch Famine.
“Transgenerational Biology” - The Biology of Heritable Memories | Oded Rechavi | TEDxVienna
Super interesting research so I wanted to look more into it and came across this paper by Rechavi published in Cell on the topic.
Just absolutely wild and definitely worth a read (link to the article below)!
Starvation-Induced Transgenerational Inheritance of Small RNAs in C. elegans - PMC
📤 Out of the Box: Fish Operated Vehicle
Never thought the words “Fish Operated Vehicle” (FOV) would be a thing but here we are and it’s actually very cool XD.
Didn’t know it was possible to train goldfish to do anything but apparently, they can pilot DIY Gundams for food pellets.
Not the actual Goldfish piloting the FOV *
Not the actual Goldfish piloting the FOV *
From fish out of water to new insights on navigation mechanisms in animals - PubMed
🤣 Exclusive Memes
In Conclusion,
Well, that rounds out our 3rd publication of the Journal of Struggling Scientists!
We really hope you enjoyed it and found some value in it. If so, please consider subscribing if you haven’t already!
If you’d like to reach out to us for whatever reason you can contact us via our email, or follow us on Twitter or Instagram.
As always you can listen to The Struggling Scientists podcast on your podcast platform of choice with new episodes out every other week.
See you, next time folks!
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