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Chicago Sun-Times Opinion This Week
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A Chicago pharmacist was accused on Tuesday of selling more than 100 blank COVID-19 vaccination cards. There have also been reports of fake vaccination cards — complete with the CDC logo — shipping to places throughout the U.S. from China. That’s the new trend: People paying for fake vaccination cards rather than taking the free and life-saving shot.
Ensuring people are vaccinated is an important part of trying to reduce the rate of COVID-19 infections. It’s time to create a reliable vaccine ID that schools, organizations, businesses and government can rely on, the Editorial Board writes.
News this week has also included back-to-back senseless Chicago shootings and Afghanistan. There are fears that thousands of Afghan civilians who helped the American military will be killed or imprisoned by the Taliban. Yet we are witnessing an even greater tragedy here in America’s big cities, Peter V. Grafner of Edgebrook writes.
In Letters to the Editor, Peter says that we can only now imagine what good the $2 trillion we spent in Afghanistan might have done here had it been used for educational, mental health and public safety services in our nation’s biggest cities.
In Chicago, random shootings of seniors and children have put our city on edge. A 7-year-old was shot and killed on Sunday, a 70-year-old woman was shot dead early Monday and a beloved 67-year-old special education teacher experienced the same fate on Tuesday on the Dan Ryan Expressway.
What’s the motive? Revenge? Money? An attempted carjacking? Hate? In Commentary, Mary Mitchell writes that because we don’t know the why, we are haunted by our own vulnerability.
— Ismael Pérez, editorial board member

A nurse from AltaMed Health Services hands out the vaccine card to people after receiving their COVID-19 vaccine in Los Angeles on Tuesday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
A nurse from AltaMed Health Services hands out the vaccine card to people after receiving their COVID-19 vaccine in Los Angeles on Tuesday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
The United States needs a better vaccination ID.
Unlike many other countries with electronic systems, the Centers for Disease Control issues flimsy paper IDs as proof individuals have been vaccinated. The IDs are easily forged, don’t fit in a wallet and are vulnerable to wear and tear.
Ensuring people are vaccinated is an important part of trying to reduce the rate of COVID-19 infections. Many businesses, schools and government agencies now require proof of vaccination.
Chicago Public Schools teachers, staff and vendors must be vaccinated by Oct. 15 unless they have a medical or religious exemption. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that at least 675 colleges and universities require proof of inoculations. Federal workers must be vaccinated or get regular testing. Google, Facebook, Disney, Netflix, Cisco, Frontier Airlines, Walmart, Walt Disney Co., Microsoft and Tyson Foods are among the companies that now mandate vaccinations. Businesses are offering discounts and freebies to fully vaccinated people.
In short, it’s no surprise, if a bit pathetic, that there’s a growing market for counterfeit vaccine IDs among people who shun vaccinations.
The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board is the opinion voice of the hardest-working newspaper in America. It is headed by editorial page editor Tom McNamee and includes Thomas FrisbieLee BeyIsmael Pérez and Mary Mitchell as members.
What others have to say
Mary Mitchell on criminals shooting seniors and children in Chicago:
The only thing we know for sure is these shootings are the work of cowards — dangerous ones.
More editorials we published this week
America’s ugly exit from Afghanistan became inevitable years ago
For the safety of all, vaccinations should be mandatory at ICE detention centers
In your words
“One national goal set out in the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution is to ‘promote the general welfare’ of the American people. That should be our highest priority.”
— Peter V. Grafner, Edgebrook
Every day we publish submissions from Chicago Sun-Times readers weighing in on issues facing the city and its residents. Send letters to letters@suntimes.com or reply to this email to share your perspective.
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Chicago Sun-Times Opinion This Week

A weekly overview of opinions, analysis and commentary on issues affecting Chicago, Illinois and our nation by outside contributors, Sun-Times readers and the CST Editorial Board.

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