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Chicago Sun-Times Opinion This Week
Good morning,
Refill that cup of coffee because you are about to read through a well-rounded newsletter featuring the latest Sun-Times commentary on subjects such as health, entertainment and the raging Chicago gun violence.
First up is our lead editorial on the Food and Drug Administration’s approval of aducanumab — the first new Alzheimer’s drug since 2003. Instead of celebrating, we are troubled by the FDA’s action. The FDA must keep the pressure on Biogen, the maker of the newly approved Alzheimer’s drug, to follow through on more clinical trials. Alzheimer’s patients and families need real hope, not false promises, the Editorial Board writes.
We also wrote an editorial about Tuesday’s Chicago Sun-Times front page story that read “Children in Chicago are dying from gun violence at a rate three times higher than last year.” We have written about this many times, to the point that we find it frustrating. But we know there are partial solutions that work, and we have to keep pushing. We have no choice.
Sun-Times reader Richard Barber of Mount Greenwood had something to add to the subject in Letters to the Editor: Victims of gun violence deserve a voice — not just when a cop is involved.
Lastly, in Commentary, we bring you a recommendation for your weekend entertainment from Richard Roeper. He writes about the perfect summer movie, “In the Heights,” which features multiple group numbers incorporating pop, merengue, hip-hop, salsa and classic Broadway influences, and you’ll find it impossible to keep still in your seat. Read, watch and see if you agree.
— Ismael Pérez, editorial board member

Many Alzheimer’s patients and families are likely celebrating the FDA’s approval of a new treatment for the disease, aducanumab. We fear they’re being sold false hope, the Editorial Board writes. | THINKSTOCK
Many Alzheimer’s patients and families are likely celebrating the FDA’s approval of a new treatment for the disease, aducanumab. We fear they’re being sold false hope, the Editorial Board writes. | THINKSTOCK
It’s been nearly two decades since a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and millions of patients and their families are desperate for new therapies against the incurable brain disease.
More than 6 million Americans are living with the memory loss and other debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s, with millions more expected to suffer from the disease as the population ages. Treatments are elusive: 99% of clinical trials of new Alzheimer’s drugs end in failure.
Any drug that proved successful would be a rare scientific breakthrough.
Yet we fear that the celebration among some patient advocates and families over the FDA’s approval of aducanumab — the first new Alzheimer’s drug since 2003 — is false hope.
There are simply too many unanswered questions about the drug’s effectiveness and safety, including the threat of potential side effects such as brain swelling or bleeding.
Instead of celebrating, we’re troubled by the FDA’s action.
The Chicago Sun-Times Editorial Board is the opinion voice of the hardest-working newspaper in America. It is headed by editorial page editor Tom McNamee and includes Thomas FrisbieLorraine ForteLee BeyIsmael Pérez and Mary Mitchell as members.
What Richard Roeper has to say
In the Heights
“… while it will be available simultaneously on HBO Max, one hopes the true streaming phenomenon will involve millions of movie fans streaming into theaters to catch this infectiously entertaining, fantastically choreographed, consistently involving and absolutely gorgeous musical spectacle on the biggest screen and with the best sound possible.”
‘In the Heights’ review: Entertaining and eye-popping, the Broadway hit lands with a splash on the big screen
More editorials we published this week
Saving children from gunfire calls for a long and determined commitment
Even during a pandemic, those infamous deals selling off city assets made private investors rich
In your words
“… when a police officer shoots an armed person, whether a teenager or adult, the same people who remain silent on kids getting gunned down seem to find the time and a voice to protest. Why is that?”
— Richard Barber, Mount Greenwood
Victims of gun violence always deserve a voice — not just when a cop is involved
Every day we publish submissions from Chicago Sun-Times readers weighing in on issues facing the city and its residents. Send letters to letters@suntimes.com or reply to this email to share your perspective.
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Chicago Sun-Times Opinion This Week

A weekly overview of opinions, analysis and commentary on issues affecting Chicago, Illinois and our nation by outside contributors, Sun-Times readers and the CST Editorial Board.

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