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13: Inclusive workplaces, a new adult Lego set, and Mismatch design

Hey! Welcome to this week’s Stark Difference in Design. 💌
13: Inclusive workplaces, a new adult Lego set, and Mismatch design
By Team Stark • Issue #13 • View online
Hey! Welcome to this week’s Stark Difference in Design. 💌

Tidbits from the web
Image of a workplace for an individual with a disability
Image of a workplace for an individual with a disability
…the ideal is “universal design”, which creates an environment that can be used in the widest possible range of situations without any need for adaptation. For disabled workers, this means that all the elements of a workplace need to be accessible: entrances, lifts, meeting rooms, coffee facilities and, not least, toilets. If it is difficult for people to travel to meetings, firms must provide videoconferencing. And disability is not just about mobility. People with poor vision can be helped by increasing the colour contrasts on computer displays, for example.
Image of the limited edition HAY Sonos One speakers
Image of the limited edition HAY Sonos One speakers
Color is one of the most important tools in the design process. Colors can hide completely and disappear or provide contrast. —Mette Hay
LEGO FORMA: First Of Its Kind Partnership With Indiegogo
LEGO FORMA: First Of Its Kind Partnership With Indiegogo
Beyond that, there are lot of adults who aren’t buying Lego. Those are the people Lego wants to lure in with Forma. Lego sees an untapped market in adults who are looking for a casual creative outlet but may not feel comfortable picking up a paintbrush. It’s solid business logic. According to a 2017 study, creativity is an estimated $44 billion industry, up 45% from 2011. Endeavors, like drawing, coloring, and crafting, have become 21st-century tranquilizers for over-subscribed, unfulfilled adults.
Bookworms
Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design (Book)
Mismatch: How Inclusion Shapes Design (Book)
For better or worse, the people who design the touchpoints of society determine who can participate and who’s left out. Often unwittingly.
Not entirely sure there currently is or ever will be a more thorough, empathetic, informative and well-written book around the topic of inclusivity — from accessibility and exclusiveness to disabilities, the role of designers, and more.
Kat Holmes takes the time to give such a well rounded picture that is easily digestible and much needed in not only the design community but the tech industry as a whole. It should be a must read and standard in design school.
Updates on Stark:
The folks at Cotton Bureau are going to town for the holidays and our shirt is up for sale. Want to get a holiday present for the designer in your life? Or yourself? Or just want to support the world of accessibility? All perfect reasons. Go get yours now!
Are you let down? If so, where and why? Where does the biggest hesitancy come in for the individual not keen on focusing on making your product inclusive?
Saska
@AshleighhR @getstarkco One of our devs came to look at my designs yesterday and I used the word “red” and he went “where? I’m colourblind” so I started proper looking into it 🙈
10:52 AM - 13 Nov 2018
Liked this newsletter? Let us know! We’re always talking shop on Twitter @getstarkco.
⚫️ The Stark Crew ⚪️
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