View profile

Polymathic Monthly - Issue #33: Vint Cerf, Pricing, Water and Arjen Robben.

Revue
 
Surreal. That's how it felt meeting Vint Cerf and Elise Roy a few months ago. As a technology optimis
 

Polymathic Monthly

March 31 · Issue #33 · View online
A curation of articles, tech, books and innovation strategy to enrich your career and personal lives.

Surreal. That’s how it felt meeting Vint Cerf and Elise Roy a few months ago. As a technology optimist (and, mostly, an optimistic realist) it was great to interview the man widely known as one of the “Fathers of the Internet,” a co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet. And I’d been immensely enlightened by Elise Roy’s TED talk on access and inclusion in technology when I watched it last year.
Vint and Elise, both deaf, have spent their careers designing and building solutions that serve the disabled or marginalized amongst us. I’m not an interviewer, my day job is building technology for the water utility industry, but I’d say it was an enlightening conversation shot in one long take. There’s a section of the interview that’s quite self-referential considering the topic we were discussing. Vint and Elise’s message to the rest of us is that it’s time to start designing with empathy. Gone are the days when we could design products, make some ‘slight’ modifications/additions and slap on the inclusive tag. In the age of Glassbox brands, that will no longer fly (says the optimist in me).
Enjoy the video here and the newsletter links below.


Articles
Books
  • It was a big week for the ride-hailing industry with Lyft’s IPO. And right before Uber’s expected IPO in April I’d suggest you read ’Uberland’. In the book, Alex Rosenblatt shares her learnings from four years of learning more about Uber/Lyft etc like no one else ever has.
  • The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’, by Arundhati Roy, would have excelled even more if it was unrelated stories of the three main characters. I’ve picked up her other book, The God of Small Things.
  • Where The Water Goes’, by David Owen, reveals a lot of unfortunate truths about the water system in the US. Amongst those truths is that paper water, the legalese that surrounds the allocation and usage of water, actually matters more than real water that flows from rivers and wells. And that is just one of the many problems impacting the water industry in the west.
Have a fantastic April!
Seyi

Did you enjoy this issue?
If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here
Powered by Revue