Issue #12: If the PC culture will not stop, we may be all very soon terminally unavailable

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Issue #12: If the PC culture will not stop, we may be all very soon terminally unavailable
By Aurelio Porfiri • Issue #12 • View online

Jonathan Bowden, a British thinker and political activist, was very outspoken about the decadence of Europe. His extremist statements make it impossible to agree completely with what he has said, but I have to admit that his examination of the crisis of Western civilization is not without merit. In one of his books he has written: “The greatest enemy that we have—to slightly adapt Roosevelt’s slogan about fear, that there’s nothing to be afraid of except fear itself—the greatest enemy we have is raised in our own mind. The grammar of self-intolerance is what we have imposed and allowed others to impose upon us. Political correctness is a white European grammar, which we’ve been taught, and we’ve stumbled through the early phases of, and yet we’ve learned this grammar and the methodology that lies behind it very well.” Sadly, this is too true. But we must understand how important it is to have the courage to fight the Politically Correct atmosphere that surrounds us, even in our religious belief. I am growing tired and weary of the clerical speeches and pious sentiments based on such frail ground. All this talk about how much we need to love the outsider and the necessity to open up our doors, when the Vatican itself is guarded by the tightest security! And this ground I was referring to, is the spirit of worldliness that these people have embraced completely, not knowing (or not willing?) to fight against it as they ought. This atmosphere will kill us all, sooner or later.
In the website purlandtraining.com there are some examples of politically correct language, the first word is what you shouldn’t say, the other is the substitute:
  1. able-bodied > non-disabled
  2. actress > actor
  3. Australian Aborigine > Native Australian
  4. bald > follically challenged
  5. barman > bar attendant
  6. bin man > cleanliness technician
  7. black bag > bin bag
  8. black person > Person of Colour
  9. black sheep > pariah
  10. blackboard > chalk board
  11. blacklisted > banned
  12. blind > sight impaired
  13. blind drunk > very drunk
  14. boring > differently interesting
  15. broken home > dysfunctional family
  16. brother / sister > sibling
  17. chairman > chair
  18. Christian name > first name
  19. Christmas > Winter Festival / Winterval
  20. cleaner > facility manager
  21. clumsy > uniquely coordinated
  22. confined to a wheelchair > wheelchair user
  23. dead > passed away / terminally unavailable
  24. deaf > hearing impaired
  25. deforestation > forest management
  26. diabetic > person with diabetes
  27. dinner lady > mealtime supervisor
  28. disease > disorder
  29. drug addict > person with a chemical dependency
  30. drug habit > substance use disorder
  31. English > British / UK citizen
  32. Eskimo > Inuit
  33. fat > overweight / big-boned
  34. fireman > firefighter
  35. forefathers > ancestors / forebears
  36. Frenchman > French person
  37. get the sack > be part of a restructuring
  38. guys > folks
  39. hairdresser > stylist
  40. headmaster / headmistress > director
The list go on and on. All of this make us better people? I don’t think so.
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Aurelio Porfiri

Alternative thinking…think different! A newsletter that is inspired from the You Tube channel “Ritorno a Itaca” and that will deal mainly with Catholic issues, cultural things, Tradition and traditionalism for English speaking audiences.
This is a project by composer, conductor, writer and educator Aurelio Porfiri.

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