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✊🏙 Dockless bikes cannibalizing Uber 🚲 NYC subway key to prosperity 🚇 and much more!

Hey urbanists! Dockless bikes are becoming ever more common on the streets of major cities, and Uber'
✊🏙 Dockless bikes cannibalizing Uber 🚲 NYC subway key to prosperity 🚇 and much more!
By Radical Urbanist • Issue #43 • View online
Hey urbanists!
Dockless bikes are becoming ever more common on the streets of major cities, and Uber’s purchase of Jump Bike is causing it to cannibalize its ride-hailing business in San Francisco.
Plus, as government officials fight over who should pay to fix NYC’s subway, a new report argues that they need to figure it out fast because the subway is key to the city’s prosperity.
Have a great Sunday!
Paris

Dockless bikes cannibalizing Uber
In February, Uber added Jump Bikes as an option in a few cities, and more recently did the same with Lime after investing in the bike and scooter rental company. New data shows that Jump bikes are cannibalizing Uber vehicle rides in San Francisco.
As of July 1, overall trips by new Jump riders on the Uber platform climbed 15%, even as their trips in cars and SUVs declined 10%.
The upside for Uber is that at least the users switching from vehicle to bike trips are remaining within Uber’s ecosystem and switching to a mode that presumably costs Uber less per ride. However, what it means for Uber’s long-term finances remains to be seen, given that it’s still a wildly unprofitable company.
Meanwhile, Chinese bike-share giant Ofo has been rapidly scaling back its operations in North America, Australia, Europe, India, and the Middle East as it refocuses on “priority markets” in an attempt to stop losing so much money.
Eliot Brown
Whats most amazing abt this is that a company that is still a very long way from profit, has burned through ~$10 B, already faces the prospect of being disrupted https://t.co/CvCkexarcX
2:44 PM - 19 Jul 2018
NYC needs to rebuild its subway
A new report by the Manhattan Institute makes the case that the city’s residents and economy have benefited immensely from the subway, and that if it wants to maintain its prosperity, the subway needs to get the funding for necessary repairs and expansions.
New York’s mass transit system—especially its subways—has been a crucial factor for encouraging and enabling more of the residents in the city’s historically poorer neighborhoods to work. Any sustained deterioration in subway services endangers this success story. […] To protect the gains that have been made, and secure future gains, elected officials and policymakers at both the state and city level will have to invest, and invest wisely, in additional subway, bus, ferry, and other transit capacity. Otherwise, they risk presiding over stagnant job growth and workforce-participation growth that is independent of any cyclical recession.
Even though NY Transit President Andy Byford has a plan to accelerate repairs, he’s having trouble getting the money he needs from the state or city. Meanwhile, disability advocates want a more concrete commitment from Byford to expand accessibility (more about this in the Byford profile in last week’s issue) and MTA tunnel repairs will push back construction of a protected bike lane on Fourth Avenue.
Other great reads
📉 Tesla Model 3 cancellations are outpacing new orders as 24% of preorders have been refunded
🕵️‍♀️ Uber is the subject of a federal investigation over its gender discrimination
LOL: If socialism is so bad, why do we have it for car storage?
🚉 Trump’s DOT is starving US transit expansions of federal funds
🚗 Richard Florida: “the geography of car use tracks with income and wealth: Car-dependent places are considerably less affluent.
🏺 Metro expansion in Amsterdam unearthed artifacts from the 14th and 15th centuries
🛣 Chicago could lose its chance to remove its lakefront highway and redesign the area to serve people and increase transit use
🌇 How feng shui influences urban design in Hong Kong
By Paris: “The fierce individualism of digital nomads is damaging to communities, both at home and abroad, because people who feel ‘liberated’ from space have no stake in improving their local area.
✊️❤️ Thanks for reading, and feel free to follow me on Twitter, Medium, or Instagram for even more!
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