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✊🏙 Cities turning against tourism ✈️ Car use declines in Paris 📉 SUVs killing pedestrians ☠️ and much more!

Hey urbanists! As cities are flooded with tourists, residents are increasingly turning against the in
✊🏙 Cities turning against tourism ✈️ Car use declines in Paris 📉 SUVs killing pedestrians ☠️ and much more!
By Radical Urbanist • Issue #40 • View online
Hey urbanists!
As cities are flooded with tourists, residents are increasingly turning against the influx of visitors and demanding that their governments put people who are living there first, and some cities are finally responding.
Paris is one of those cities, and while the mayor has taken actions against Airbnb, she’s also been trying to transform the city’s transportation system. New numbers show car use is down, but there are other transport troubles for the French capital.
Those are the main topics this week, and you’ll find a list of other great reads at the bottom. Happy Canada Day 🇨🇦 to my fellow Canadians, and to everyone else, have a great Sunday!
Paris

Cities turning against tourism
The Guardian
The Guardian
As tourist numbers soar in the world’s biggest cities, many of them are wondering how to deal with the flood of visitors, and residents in major European destinations are demanding their governments put residents first. As a result, cities across the continent are placing restrictions and taxes on tourism to try to balance livability with the income and jobs generated by the tourism industry.
Airbnb gets a lot of attention by those looking to contain tourism because of how it takes rental units off the market, increasing prices and reducing stock for locals. Palma, Spain is poised to become the first city to ban apartments from being listed on Airbnbonly detached homes can list rooms for rent.
Barcelona, one of the leaders on anti-tourist measures, has experienced a fascinating phenomenon: while public opinion has turned against tourists, the city has opened its arms to migrants. Natalia Martínez, a councillor in an older part of Barcelona, told The Guardian that immigration has “brought more than it’s taken away in terms of identity,” while her colleague Santi Ibarra said “[t]ourism takes something out of neighbourhoods. It makes them more banal – the same as everywhere else.”
Success and failure for Parisian transport
It will come as no surprise to long-time subscribers that Parisian mayor Anne Hidalgo has been leading a campaign to reduce vehicle use in the city and to encourage people to use transit and bikes — and it appears to be paying off.
In the first five months of 2018, vehicle use fell 6.5% compared to the same time last year, with traffic in the morning peak hours down 8.7%. Those are great numbers, but the city has other challenges ahead.
As mentioned in issue 32, the Vélib bike-share system has been having trouble since a new operator took over, causing user numbers to decline as it’s become less reliable. The public body overseeing Autolib also recently ended its contract with the electric-car-sharing service’s operator because of huge losses it was unwilling to pay.
Meanwhile, LimeBike is the latest company to bring electric-scooter sharing to the city, but, unlike in California, it has a staff of 40 people to find the scooters, clear them from the streets, and charge them every night. Uber has also announced its intention to bring its Jump bike-share service to European cities this summer.
Other great reads
🚨 SUVs are responsible for the increase in pedestrian deaths. Federal safety regulators have known for years, and did nothing.
🚗 The future of Uber’s self-driving car program is numbered. Its new plan is to be the dominant platform for transportation.
🛣 David Levinson: What is the value of road space and how else could it be used?
🚐 All of the micro-transit pilots have been dismal failures
🇦🇺 Melbourne may start removing some on-street parking to build protected bike lanes
😁 “Millennials are least happy in small rural areas, much happier in small urban areas, a little less happy in the suburbs and the most happy in the largest metropolitan areas.”
🚇 New York City’s L-Train tunnel is shutting down for 15 months. What work will actually be done during that time?
👩‍🎨 Berlin is known as an artist utopia, but as rents rise and the city changes, can it still claim that title?
❌ Cars are officially banned from NYC’s Central Park
🚲 Manchester is making a huge investment in bike infrastructure
✊️❤️ Thanks for reading, and feel free to follow me on Twitter, Medium, or Instagram for even more!
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