Product Punks

By Toby Rogers

Work Is Something You Do, Not Somewhere You Go

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Toby Rogers
Toby Rogers
Hello fellow punks! 
Welcome to the 37 of you who have signed up for this since the last issue. It’s great to have you on board. Hopefully you’ll stick with me while I figure out what this newsletter is all about.
Here’s this week’s issue ⬇️

Step into my office...
If you hang out on Product Management Twitter, you can’t have missed the PM pool girls TikTok that exploded this week. 
Here it is, though, just in case:
A video posted as a fun way to explain, in simple terms, what being a PM is all about created an extraordinary backlash among people aggrieved at the idea that the duo in the video could possibly be doing “work”. 
But why? 
When just about anyone in tech can work anywhere with a decent internet connection, why would there be a problem with a couple of PMs sitting by the pool with their laptops? 
Gender and age play a huge part which I won’t go into here, although it’s interesting that this crypto bro didn’t get anywhere near as much grief for his lying down work set up:
What it does show is we’re still figuring out our relationship with how and where we do work now the internet has freed us from our offices. 
Successful remote-only product companies like Trello and Aha! have long since debunked the Agile belief that product, design and engineering need to be co-located. 
When CEOs like Jack Dorsey and Ryan Holmes can run their organisations from their phones, why does anyone need an office at all? 
We need to shake off this hangover from the Industrial Revolution. 
Work isn’t somewhere you go, it’s something you do—all that really matters is where you feel comfortable doing your best work. 
And if that’s sitting by a pool, that’s cool.
What I've been reading 📚
There’s a common myth among start-ups and product companies that it’s the next thing you build that will magically unlock product-market fit. Most of the time, that isn’t the case. This classic article from Andrew Chen is worth revisiting whenever you start thinking the only path to growth is shipping new stuff 🚢
Quality assurance is such an ingrained part of the product development process that we don’t even think about it. Have you ever stopped to think about the role QA actually plays, though? Maybe its better to put the responsibility for quality on the shoulders of your developers, not another department 🐛
QA is evil!. QA as part of development process… | by Alon Harel | Medium
I’m just over a week into a new role so I’m thinking a lot about onboarding and how to make sure I’m setting myself up for success. While this post is primarily aimed at engineers, there are a lot of useful tips for anyone transitioning into a new job 👇
What I Wish I Knew About Onboarding Effectively
What I've been writing ✍️
A lot of product management is about leadership. It’s challenging having to lead and influence people who aren’t your direct reports, though.
Here’s a thread of some of my favourite leadership advice to help any PM get better at it 👇
Toby Rogers 🚀🤘
As a product manager, your success depends on how well you lead your team.

Here are 9 threads guaranteed to help every PM improve their leadership skills 🧵 ⬇️
For many products, onboarding (the product kind, not the new job kind) ends up being an afterthought.
Really, though, the way you bring people in and guide them towards their aha! moment is the most important part of the customer experience.
Here are some of the resources that have helped me get better at it 👇
Toby Rogers 🚀🤘
Onboarding is the most important part of your customer's journey.

Here are 9 resources to help every product manager get it right 🧵 ⬇️
In B2B, it’s really tempting to dismiss features your prospects are asking you for with the “it’s on our roadmap” cliche.
But that doesn’t help you learn anything new about the problems your product is meant to be solving.
Here are a few ideas about what to do instead 🧐
Toby Rogers 🚀🤘
When a potential customer asks "does your product do X / have Y feature?" it can be really tempting to just say "not yet, but it's on our roadmap."

That's just a quick get-out, though, and doesn't help you learn anything about their problem 🧵 ⬇️
That’s it! 
See you next week (probably). 
Toby 
The Punk PM 
P.S. Feel free to share this with anyone else you think would find it interesting.
I’m still playing around with ideas for content and format for this newsletter, so I’d love to hear your thoughts. Go ahead and shoot me an email with ways you think I can make it better.
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Toby Rogers
Toby Rogers @tobiasrogers

Product management musings from your favourite Punk PM

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