North Staffs News

By North Staffs News

Be a Camerado

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North Staffs News
North Staffs News
When life is pants - be a Camerado
A new local project, the ‘Potteries Camerados’, is opening on Tuesday 1st March, at the Geek Retreat, Hanley.
Fiona Wood, who’s working to establish the project locally, explains what it’s all about:
“The pandemic has shown us that even when life is ‘pants’, we can get through tough times by being a ‘camerado’ and looking out for each other.
"Potteries Camerados aims to have conversations with local people in Stoke-on-Trent, listening to hear what gets them through when life is ‘pants’.
"We don’t try to fix people, just be alongside, as we need to remember that ‘life is more than just a bit … at the minute’, and to remind ourselves that it is ok to dance even if you don’t know the moves, and that there is nothing to prove, and that it is ok to fail, with this struggle it is ok to ask someone to help you.”
Fiona continued: “Potteries Camerados will be holding a number of events over the next 12 months. From pop-up Public Living Rooms around the 6 towns, to showing up at local events, bringing our Public Living Room to the communities to use as a place to go to, to meet others, tackle loneliness or have a chat with us or a stranger, it is the choice of the individual.”
The Camerados ‘movement’ started in the UK in 2015, but there are now Public Living Rooms around the globe where people meet to look out for each other, especially when times are difficult for whatever reason.
Gemma is a camerado and NHS worker living in Rotherham, she said: “The past 18 months has taught me so much. It’s been tough at times but the main thing I have learnt is that human connection is my most powerful fuel. It is what helps me keep going. When people get together in whatever form, on the phone, on a video call or face to face , something magic happens. That magic only gets more powerful when you mix people together who don’t normally mix , who don’t look or act like one another. We all need more magic in our lives and our worlds . So let’s create more opportunities to mix it up.”
Find out more about the ever growing Camerados movement by visiting their website:
We wish this new project well as it establishes here in Stoke-on-Trent! In fact, Tuesday 1st March is Pancake Day too, I wonder if there’ll be pancakes?J
Staffordshire Invertebrate Science Fair
This really caught the editor’s eye - he LOVES bugs!
The Staffordshire Invertebrate Science Fair (let’s just call it Staffs Bugs Fest, shall we?) is an annual wildlife conservation event aimed at families, students, amateurs and pretty much anyone with a passing interest or enquiring mind about invertebrates.
This year it is on Saturday, March 5th from 10:30am, at Staffordshire University in Stoke-on-Trent.
Andy Jukes, Invertebrate Ecologist at Conops Entomology Ltd, told North Staffs News: “If you want to learn more about invertebrates, whether they are beetles, butterflies, spiders or bees, the Staffordshire Invertebrate Science Fair could be just the place for you.
"Come and chat to experts, do fun activities like indoor pond dipping, meet conservation groups and enthusiasts, have a go at identifying insects and find out how to get involved with invertebrate conservation in the UK.
"There are also a series of talks going on all day including world fly expert Dr.Erica McAlister for the Natural History Museum in London, who is giving a talk on her new children’s book ‘A bug’s world’.
"It’s all taking place under one roof at Staffordshire University, Leek Road, Stoke-on-Trent.
"Keep up-to-date with the event on Facebook @staffsbugfest, or Twitter @SISF_2022.”
That’s it then, it’s in the editor’s diary! J :o)
Arthur Berry: A Ragged Richness closes this week
Amanda Bromley has been in touch to remind us that the fabulous exhibition Arthur Berry: A Ragged Richness, currently at The Brampton Museum and Art Gallery in Newcastle-under-Lyme, closes on Saturday 6th March.
Amanda told us: “Arthur Berry A Ragged Richness, at The Brampton Museum and Art Gallery, opened on 15th January and continues to 6th March. The show has been a great success with over 20 of the 25 paintings selling, from between £1850 to £3200, making it the best selling show that the Museum has ever experienced.”
The exhibition opened on 15th January, and has been a huge success. There's still time to catch it!
The exhibition opened on 15th January, and has been a huge success. There's still time to catch it!
Micheal Howard, Senior Lecturer in history of art and design at the Metropolitan University in Manchester, has reviewed the book which accompanies this exhibition.
He wrote:
Surely one of the defining characteristics of a great artist is that their work, created however long ago and under whatever circumstances, speaks to us today about concerns that are still central to our lives. Arthur Berry’s paintings and drawings do just this. He stands with L.S. Lowry and Theodore Major as an artist who, though indelibly attached to his home environment, made from that experience an art that transcends geographical and temporal boundaries to remain relevant and compelling to us today.
At last a publication has appeared that will bring Berry to a broader public. Arthur Berry: A Ragged Richness, is an elegant and informative introduction to the artist and his work. Published by the Barewall Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent, it opens with a touching introduction by Anthony Cosgrove, the main text consisting of a critically acute appraisal of the artist’s life and work by Peter Davies. These two pieces of writing serve as an effective and thought-provoking context in which to savour the many well-chosen examples of Berry’s work.
Berry rejected any notion of gentility and good taste, the curse of so much English art, for that he owes much to the example of Jean Dubuffet, the French artist whose work inspired so many painters in the 1950s, but Berry’s art was always his own. His subject matter was the world around him, the people and architecture of his native Stoke-on-Trent and its environs; his surfaces are rich, crackle with electricity, and are as gorgeous as a piece of abandoned rust-encrusted corrugated iron. Disturbing in its abrasive directness, but shot through with a current of dark humour, his raw, ragged surfaces carry a meaning that, like music, cuts directly into our innermost selves. This capacity is not given to many artists - but Berry has it. Like Lowry and Theodore Major, with whom he shared a passion for the paintings of William Blake and Van Gogh, he saw the world afresh, finding a raw beauty in all its aspects. In troubled times it is to such artists, whose work bears the indelible stamp of the authentic, that we turn.
The book Arthur Berry A Ragged Richness ISBN 978-1800681699 is available in the Potteries from Barewall Art Gallery (Burslem), Brampton Museum and Art Gallery (Newcastle), Potteries Museum and Art Gallery (Hanley), New Victoria Theatre, The Art Studio, Leek Bookshop, Clark Art in Hale, or from Amazon.
For more information contact Amanda Bromley, Barewall Art Gallery, email shop@barewall.co.uk, or telephone 07932 717 718.
About North Staffs News
We’re a friendly little news bulletin for North Staffordshire. Constructive and solutions-focused, we share news-in-brief of positive things happening locally.
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