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🌈 What colour do you feel?

🌈 What colour do you feel?
By Dan Mason • Issue #17 • View online
🎨  Free tools for choosing a hue for you (and your brand).
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Colours evoke feelings, as do typography and imagery. That’s why they’re at the heart of brand-building.
But they are just as important if you are a freelance creative - your own brand. The choice of colour for your website, logo or email signature starts with how it makes you feel. So what colour says ‘this is me’?
Pick and mix
Colorzilla: A colour Swiss Army knife in your browser
Colorzilla: A colour Swiss Army knife in your browser
ColorZilla. You spot a colour you love online … but what is it? Using the handy eyedropper that sits at the top of your Chrome browser, ColorZilla makes it simple to sample and save the colour information. It’s also a handy library of hues you use, a palette browser and webpage colour analyser.
Start with a palette
Coolors: Colour me happy
Coolors: Colour me happy
Coolors. Not only is Coolors packed with features for exploring, editing and sharing colour palettes, it makes it feel like fun. Just hit the spacebar to generate random palettes, which can then be tweaked manually. Loads of export options. Feels good to me.
ColorHub: Smart previews of your palette
ColorHub: Smart previews of your palette
Also tryColorHub. Create your palette in three easy steps: choose a preset, customise it, then export the CSS code. There’s no option to download palettes as an image, but the preview is smart.
Start with a single colour
Muzli Colors: Pick a single colour and take it from there
Muzli Colors: Pick a single colour and take it from there
Muzli Colors. Select a colour from a grid and Muzli will suggest palettes for further fine-tuning. Nice approach, but export options are limited, and I prefer palette images to display #hex codes.
Like Coolors and others, Muzli will create palettes based on an image you upload.
Start with a colour wheel
Paletton: The old and gold colour wheel
Paletton: The old and gold colour wheel
Paletton. I’ve been using this for years and admit the interface isn’t at the funky end of the scale (in fact, the last update was 2014. But then the colour wheel was invented by Isaac Newton in 1666). Still, Paletton is a powerful palette builder, with tons of preview and export options. Drag around the outer dial to select an initial palette, sliding the inner-wheel dots to adjust shades.
Also try … Adobe Color. While Color is open to all, you have to log in to your Adobe account to save or export palettes. Check out the ‘accessibility tools’ that give a pass or fail rating for different colour combinations.
I often like to project a strong single colour, with a relief colour that doesn’t steal the spotlight. Selecting monochromatic (variations of the same base colour) or analogous (adjacent colours on the wheel) is a good start, while choosing complementary colours (opposite sides of the wheel), or triadic (thirds) delivers more dramatic contrasts.
Then there's ...
Canva: A suite of colour tools with everyone's favourite design tool
Canva: A suite of colour tools with everyone's favourite design tool
Canva. The palette generator isn’t as flexible as those above, but there’s more, with separate tabs for colour wheel, palette ideas, and an interesting ‘colour meanings’ tool.
Anything else?
ColorLisa: The palettes of the masters revealed
ColorLisa: The palettes of the masters revealed
ColorLisa is a fascinating tool that displays the palette used by famous artists in some of their best-known works. Artists are listed from A-Z and the palettes link to their masterpieces displayed around the internet.
BrandColors: Hundreds of brand palettes, including Airbus
BrandColors: Hundreds of brand palettes, including Airbus
BrandColors is, as the name suggests, a site with the palettes used by hundreds of the world’s big brands. I didn’t realise Airbus was such a colourful company.
❓What is all this stuff about colour wheels anyway? Here’s a guide to colour theory.
Thanks for reading 👏
🌍 I’ve been fortunate to work with amazing creatives and causes around the world as a trainer and educator. I get lots of ‘how do I …’ questions, so I started this newsletter to share the answers.
If you enjoy it, please share it! And if you have a question, suggestion or useful stuff you’d like to share, get in touch: dan@danmason.co.uk 🔗 bio.link/masondan
⭐️ Main image: Ivanovgood/Pixabay
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