WWDC, wuu2? - The All-Inclusive Newsletter #11

#11・
274

subscribers

21

issues

Subscribe to our newsletter

By subscribing, you agree with Revue’s Terms of Service and Privacy Policy and understand that The Book Accountability Project will receive your email address.

WWDC, wuu2? - The All-Inclusive Newsletter #11
By Liam O'Dell • Issue #11 • View online
Good evening!
Welcome to what has turned out to be a bumper edition of the All-Inclusive Newsletter, complete with:
  • the lowdown from Apple’s WWDC
  • a review of Twitter’s paid subscription model, Twitter Blue
  • news from Twitter’s verification team
  • and much more!
Let’s dive into it…

🗞️ Read A11y 'bout it!
Captions coming soon to all Twitter Spaces
Clubhouse's ALT Fault
Don't make things aste-risky...
Watch your (exclusive) language!
Super Follows may not be so super for disabled creatives
#30DaysOfDisabledPride
Caption your content as your YouTube video processes...
🍎 The FYI on the WWDC
Three Memojis are in front of three MacBook laptops, their faces lit up by the glow of the screens. On the left is a white woman with round glasses and whispy orange hair. In the middle is a brown woman with freckles and straight, shoulder-length hair which is lit blue by the light. On the right is a Black man with a moustache and beard, along with short, afro hair. He has a white AirPod earphone in his left ear. Photo: Apple.
Three Memojis are in front of three MacBook laptops, their faces lit up by the glow of the screens. On the left is a white woman with round glasses and whispy orange hair. In the middle is a brown woman with freckles and straight, shoulder-length hair which is lit blue by the light. On the right is a Black man with a moustache and beard, along with short, afro hair. He has a white AirPod earphone in his left ear. Photo: Apple.
Apple’s latest Worldwide Developers Conference took place earlier this week, and there were a few accessibility updates underneath the surface of the new updates to their operating systems.
FaceTime now has Grid View, rather than those intimidating squares of different sizes. Such a layout will certainly be interesting to Deaf users who may want to see an interpreter, for example, alongside anyone speaking. There are instances whereby users will want parity between every participant in a call. There’s also Voice Isolation on calls to focus specifically on the voice and get rid of unnecessary background noise - perfect for Deaf people like me.
Live Text could work wonders for making real-life text computerised, and therefore, accessible, while you can now access image descriptions from Markup. The press release for iOS, meanwhile, confirmed what was previously announced - such as background sounds and the ability to import audiograms.
You can read summaries of the new accessibility features for iOS, macOS and iPadOS on their respective newsroom pages.
📊 Our survey says...?
Liam O'Dell
On the fairness of the verification process, @iamb says the current policy has been designed in consultation with different stakeholder groups. He says that a "demographic survey" will appear to see which areas of the policy/application might be introducing any bias.
As Twitter recently reopened its verification process, I tuned in to a Twitter Space where those involved in bestowing the blue tick on accounts ran through the new policy. I put together a thread with the key details, but the one above is particularly interesting: a demographics survey will be added to the application process to assess whether any bias is at play.
It isn’t the first time that a social media platform has collected data on the impact of its features on marginalised communities. In late 2020, YouTube announced that it would invite creators to take part in a voluntary survey for them to track algorithmic bias. It would focus on gender, race, sexual orientation and ethnicity to begin with, but not disability - despite issues previously being raised around the demonetisation of disabled YouTubers’ content.
If you remember the recent change to image previews on Twitter, then that was also informed by data - released last month, in fact. The key stat was that, when comparing photos of Black and white people, “there was a 4 percent difference […] in favor of white individuals”, and the study was no doubt influenced by reports that Twitter’s previous image preview tool was biased in terms of photos of Black and white people.
Now, considering Twitter is now collecting data on verification applications, it will be fascinating to see what impact - if any - the platform’s policies have had on disabled users. There’s already been reports of disabled creators being rejected within hours (mine was rejected within weeks), and as fellow Deafie Quinn says, I’ll be curious to know just how many disabled people are verified through the new policy, compared to other demographics.
Here’s hoping, just like previous data, Twitter shares its findings in due course.
🔵 Twitter's Blue, da ba de, da ba di...
🎨 The absolute state of the art...
YouTube
What’s the last channel you subscribed to? https://t.co/JjLlbG0tT4
Emoji or ASCII art may look pretty, but it’s pretty inaccessible, too. As fellow disability activist James Rath illustrates in one tweet (which shows red and black emoji text from YouTube’s Twitter account) which reads ‘Hello 2021, screen readers will read every single emoji in the post, giving it its full name in Unicode, before moving on to the next one. In James’ example, it would read ‘red square, white square, white square, red square’ ad infinitum. Not only is it inaccessible, but it’s also incredibly annoying.
The solution is simple, and YouTube seems to have been made aware of it. You just need to take a photo of the emoji/ASCII art and add alt text to that on Twitter before posting. If your social media strategy includes emoji art, then you might want to get that fixed.
💰 Should paid features even exist?
Liam O'Dell
I realise my initial question may have been misinterpreted a little. I’m curious to know: should apps offer paid features at all, because a tool which doesn’t have an *immediate* accessibility benefit could have some?
Conversation has turned to paid models and accessibility in recent weeks, not least because Twitter is rolling out features to help its users make money. From Super Followers, to Tip Jars, to its new Twitter Blue subscription offer. Yet, the situation with the Twitter ‘reader’ tool (mentioned above), and fellow disability advocate James Rath’s post about having to buy YouTube Premium for background listening makes me wonder: can a paid feature ever exist, if any paid feature has the potential to have accessibility benefits?
Thank you to everyone who responded. You can tap through the tweet above to read everyone’s replies.
👋🏻 See you on 25 June!
First things first: if you like what I do around here, I’ve set up a CashApp profile! I have no plans to make this newsletter a paid newsletter any time soon, but if you ever wanted to show your appreciation, CashApp is the place to do it.
Alternatively, you can do me a massive favour for free, and give this newsletter a share on social media, or forward it to one of your friends, if you think they might be interested. My next target is 150 subscribers and I’d love to get there by the end of the year.
Aside from that, I’ll see you in a fortnight!
Liam
Did you enjoy this issue?
Liam O'Dell

I'm writing my first book, and I want you to follow my journey, but also motivate me to put words on a page.

Formerly 'The All-Inclusive Newsletter', this newsletter will share updates as I begin to compile my debut, but will also be a way for me to reach out with ways you can be involved, and support the work I'm doing.

Sign up to The Book Accountability Project for updates on my writing progress when I have them.
------
Hi, I'm Liam. I'm a Deaf and disabled journalist and campaigner who is now writing my first non-fiction book, and needs people to hold me accountable.

In order to unsubscribe, click here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue