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LanceList - Issue #75

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Inside SpaceX; A Big Intel Flaw; Samsung Note 9 Review; iMac 20
 

LanceList

August 15 · Issue #75 · View online
Tech stories that matter, Gadget Quests, nerd pursuits, and other things you ought to know.

Inside SpaceX; A Big Intel Flaw; Samsung Note 9 Review; iMac 20

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The next ship. Boeing and SpaceX are in a race to get people back into space on a U.S.-built rocket. Boeing has its CST-100 Starliner and Space has the Crew Dragon module. Only one, however, opened their module (a perfect mockup) to press. This week SpaceX gave tours to a handful of journalists who sat inside the 4- seat module and played with the controls. They saw the simulators and even met with the astronauts scheduled to fly sometime next year. It’s all catnip for space nerds.
SpaceX reveals the controls of its Dragon spacecraft for the first time | Ars Technica SpaceX reveals the controls of its Dragon spacecraft for the first time | Ars Technica
Don’t panic, yet. Researchers discovered a critical vulnerability in a large swath of Intel processors. The Foreshadow flaw could give hackers access to what’s known as the secure enclave. Yes, that’s supposed to be the most secure part of the chip, one that doesn’t share code with operations running in other parts of the chip. The good news is the flaw is not out in the wild and isn’t easy to exploit. The bad news is that two separate teams discovered it, meaning other, more black-hatted hackers, soon will, too.
New 'Foreshadow' Flaw Exploits Intel Chips To Steal Protected Data New 'Foreshadow' Flaw Exploits Intel Chips To Steal Protected Data
Samsung Note 9, the review. I put aside my iPhone X to spend uninterrupted days with the new Samsung Galaxy Note 9. Yes, it’s a big (6.4-inch), heavy (over 200 grams) phone. And, yet, I love it. It’s got the power, the screen and that very nifty S Pen. If you’re an Android, fan read this review and then you may want to start saving up your pennies, dimes and one hundred-dollar bills.
Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is everything you want Android to be, except affordable Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is everything you want Android to be, except affordable
iMac history lesson. The iMac, the computer that saved Apple, is 20 years old. I have to admit that when I first saw it in 1998, I thought the semitransparent candy-colored design was a step back. I was wrong. People loved the cute, VW-Bug-ish design, the colors, and that handle. Each successive iMac has pushed the boundaries of desktop computer design, leaving competitors to follow and copy. This history puts it all in perspective.
Apple's revolutionary iMac is 20 years old, and still going strong Apple's revolutionary iMac is 20 years old, and still going strong
P.S. Heal the glass
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