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#181: The Color of Money 💵

If you won the lottery, what would you do with the money? Many people say they’d share the jackpot wi
The Highlighter
#181: The Color of Money 💵
By Mark Isero • Issue #181 • View online
If you won the lottery, what would you do with the money? Many people say they’d share the jackpot with friends and family. But what if your financial success did not come suddenly, and in fact emerged as a result of your hard work? Today’s lead article explores how our racial identity impacts how we think about money and the responsibility we feel to share our wealth (or not). Please read it!
Also in today’s issue, you’ll find great articles profiling Nikole Hannah-Jones (my favorite journalist), telling the grim history of Chinese American expulsion in California, and exposing wacky people who like to own exotic animals and run private zoos.
At long last, after months of rain and cold, Highlighter Happy Hour is back! Join fellow subscribers on March 7 at Room 389 in Oakland beginning at 5:30 pm. Meet new people, chat about the articles, and win spectacular prizes. Get your free ticket here!

The Color of Money
Nikole Hannah-Jones on Journalism, Racial Injustice and School Segregation
Sage, who belongs to loyal reader Anne, reminds you to take care of yourself. Want your pet to appear in The Highlighter? hltr.co/pets
Sage, who belongs to loyal reader Anne, reminds you to take care of yourself. Want your pet to appear in The Highlighter? hltr.co/pets
The Expulsion of Chinese-Americans from Towns in Northern California
How Lily the Bear Triggered a Fight Over Private Zoos and the Lives of Animals
+ Reader Annotations: In this thoughtful response, loyal reader Nicki interrogates the prevailing notion that college leads to the American dream.
If I were to oversimplify what Success Academy (#169) stands for — college at all costs — then the points raised in the story, “Here’s Why So Many Americans Feel Cheated by Their Student Loans” (#180) illustrate many reasons why higher education may not be the “great equalizer.” To the extent that I firmly believe higher education is a vehicle for social mobility, I wonder how much of my belief is shaped by the “education gospel” Grubb writes about. It is likely I have internalized this idea, but what is the alternative to higher education that would also lead to a greater likelihood of social mobility? Would I recommend my own offspring to pursue higher education despite financial strain? I 100% would. What does this mean?
Want to join in on the conversation? All you have to do is hit reply!
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Mark Isero

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