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#93: My Family’s Slave

Welcome to the 93rd edition of The Highlighter! This week, I found myself amid a flurry of excellent
The Highlighter
#93: My Family’s Slave
By Mark Isero • Issue #93 • View online
Welcome to the 93rd edition of The Highlighter! This week, I found myself amid a flurry of excellent reporting in the political world (the current scoop score: Washington Post 1 ½, New York Times 1 ½) and excellent writing everywhere else. There was indeed no shortage of high-quality pieces, and I’m proud to say that I’ve selected five of my favorites.
The first three articles — about slavery, a foiled terrorist attack, and the history of racism in the United States — surface the various ways we come to acknowledge the pain we have caused others in our family and community. How do we say we’re sorry and take steps to heal? What’s the best way to make amends — is it through a public eulogy, or punishment, or remorse and repentance, or truth and reconciliation?
After the photo break, the tone shifts, and I include two personal pieces — the first about parenting (and reading), the second about dating (and getting a job). If you’re not in the mood for heavy-heavy, stick with these two. Whatever you choose, please try a few, and thank you for reading The Highlighter!

A Story of Slavery in Modern America
“The Only Good Muslim Is a Dead Muslim”
Bryan Stevenson: “The opposite of poverty isn’t wealth. It’s justice.”
Kelly has been doing a lot of reading in Ms. Michele’s advisory! Each star has a book title on it. Tracking and celebrating reading are two key ingredients in a successful independent reading program.
Kelly has been doing a lot of reading in Ms. Michele’s advisory! Each star has a book title on it. Tracking and celebrating reading are two key ingredients in a successful independent reading program.
My Bad Parenting Advice Addiction
Getting a Job Is Like Online Dating
Thank you for reading today’s issue! Twelve thumbs up last week, and zero thumbs down! Go ahead and vote again if you like. For extra credit, try to bring up The Highlighter naturally in a conversation with friends or family. Say it all casually, as if everyone knows about it. If they don’t react, follow up with, “You do know about The Highlighter, don’t you?” Please let me know how it goes! See you next Thursday at 9:10 am.
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Mark Isero

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