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#236: Moms 4 Housing

The Highlighter
As we shelter in place, loyal readers, I am reminded of the generosity of our reading community. Many of you have reached out to say hi, let me know that you appreciate the articles, and sent in poems and photos that are bringing you comfort. Thank you.
This week’s pieces explore a range of topics, including the housing crisis in the Bay Area, the role of race at colleges and universities, the rise of artificial intelligence in K-12 education, and the ability of humans to adapt and survive (especially when they’re on TV). If you have time for just one, I’d recommend the lead article, “The House on Magnolia Street,” even if you’re not from the Bay Area.
+ Our Article Club discussions of “The Crane Wife” went extremely well, thanks to author CJ Hauser, who joined Becky, Jennifer, Tony, Peter, Michele, Jessica, Dan, Kati, Sonya, Carina, Summer, Jim, Samantha, and Marni. If you might be interested in participating next month, you can sign up for Article Club here.

Moms 4 Housing: How Black Mothers Took On The Housing Crisis in Oakland
Black Girl, White College
Hyko, who belongs to loyal reader Luke, is happy he’s making his second appearance in The Highlighter. Longtime readers, you last saw Hyko in Issue #151. Want to nominate your pet to appear in the newsletter? hltr.co/pets
Hyko, who belongs to loyal reader Luke, is happy he’s making his second appearance in The Highlighter. Longtime readers, you last saw Hyko in Issue #151. Want to nominate your pet to appear in the newsletter? hltr.co/pets
Can Computers Replace Teachers?
Naked And Afraid
+ Reader Annotations: After reading last week’s standout article, “Just Desserts,” loyal reader Julie pointed out that the documentary Cheer, also set in Corsicana, Texas, referred to Collin Street Bakery, home of fruitcake fortune embezzler Sandy Jenkins. Maybe all things intriguing come from Texas?
Loyal reader Kati enjoyed “In Defense of Public Knitting” (#227) and has received backlash when she has participated in the practice:
I belong to our local Stitch ’n Bitch group in Fremont. We are sometimes met with disdain when we meet in public, but that’s generally (I think) because we only purchase one drink and then tie up the table for three hours. But the knitting definitely has something to do with it. People get more used to seeing knitting as time goes by, although the performance artist mentioned in the article — now, that was a bit much. And to anyone who belittles knitting, I’d love to see them try and knit. It’s hard! I’m not very good.
Thank you, Julie and Kati, for sharing your thoughts. Loyal readers, don’t be shy. Feel free to hit reply and contribute.
Thank you for reading today’s issue! Let me know what you thought by hitting reply or by clicking on the thumbs below. Also, let’s welcome our community’s four new subscribers: Cami, Jodie, Curt, and Savitha. I hope that you find this newsletter a welcome addition to your Thursday email inbox.
If you really like The Highlighter, please help it grow and get better. I appreciate your support. Here are a few ways you can help:
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Mark Isero
Mark Isero @iserotope

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