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Los Angeles: An Online Archive Tells an Alternate History of US Monuments

🤯 pretty much sums up last night.  While we can say with almost certainty that California will go blu
Sep 30, 2020 • View in browser
Los Angeles
🤯 pretty much sums up last night. 
While we can say with almost certainty that California will go blue this year, it wasn’t always the case. Up until the early 1990s, California mostly voted Republican. A new documentary argues that the Latino vote changed the course of California politics
Thankfully, tonight you can watch whatever you want. Our recommendation of the week: a fascinating talk about the lack of diversity in graphic design, led by two CalArts alumni.
– Elisa Wouk Almino, Senior Editor

An Alternate History of US Monuments
Allison Stewart, “Removed Albert Sidney Johnston monument, University of Texas, Austin Texas (image courtesy the artist)
Allison Stewart, “Removed Albert Sidney Johnston monument, University of Texas, Austin Texas (image courtesy the artist)
ARCHIVE MACHINES, an online exhibition hosted by the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, offers one way forward during this time of social distancing.
The exhibition takes the form of a “living archive” of stories, objects, and photographs that expand our understanding of what perspectives have been left out of official records.
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The Power of a Good Poster
Vermont S. Galloway, Westside Press, Why Executed Upon Returning from Vietnam? (image from the Collection of the Center for the Study of Political Graphics)
Vermont S. Galloway, Westside Press, Why Executed Upon Returning from Vietnam? (image from the Collection of the Center for the Study of Political Graphics)
The poster exhibition To Protect & Serve? is divided into sections that highlight various forms of police violence, from the militarization of police to gender profiling and sexual violence.
According to Carol Wells, founder of the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, a good poster disrupts your concentration:
“Everybody has this bubble around themselves and a poster has the ability to break through that bubble and grab your attention and make you look at the world differently than you did before.”
A New Film Revisits Proposition 187
The Anti-Immigrant Ballot Measure That Galvanized California's Latinx Community
Support a Cause
Byron Kim, "Cosmetic Portraits: Angela Dimayuga, Aruna D'Souza, Danny Park, Lulu Grier-Kim, Mihail Lari, Young Joon Kwak, Shizu Saldamando, Toba Khedoori, Peter Som" (2020)
Byron Kim, "Cosmetic Portraits: Angela Dimayuga, Aruna D'Souza, Danny Park, Lulu Grier-Kim, Mihail Lari, Young Joon Kwak, Shizu Saldamando, Toba Khedoori, Peter Som" (2020)
If you want to buy cool artwork and support a cause, check out GYOPO’s art benefit. The LA-based coalition offers great cultural programming and resources for people of the Korean diaspora and beyond. Currently, they’re selling a limited-edition artwork by the awesome Byron Kim to keep events free. GYOPO gives the backstory on the artwork: 
For 2020 Byron Kim has created “Cosmetic Portraits: Angela Dimayuga, Aruna D'Souza, Danny Park, Lulu Grier-Kim, Mihail Lari, Young Joon Kwak, Shizu Saldamando, Toba Khedoori, Peter Som” (2020). In collaboration with the artist, GYOPO selected nine AAPI participants in the US whose unique skin tones are represented in a grid.
Kim used makeup foundation as his medium, and the work was printed by El Nopal Press in Los Angeles. You can buy the work online or email info@gyopo.us for more info.
From Our Partners at KCET
Visions of Power and Hope: Three SoCal Art Institutions Showcase the Art of Alison Saar
Susan Silton’s ‘“Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!’ Shines the Light on COVID Victims While Supporting Postal System
Largest Film Festival of Mexican Cinema Outside of Mexico Moves Online
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