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human works design - building meaningful futures - Issue #21

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human works design - building meaningful futures

April 15 · Issue #21 · View online

'human works' empowers the game-changers of tomorrow to build meaningful futures. This newsletter is for leaders and change-makers, who want to elevate humanity by living consciously, designing conscious business that have a purpose with sustainable profit, and contributing to better systems for the diverse communities in our society, for future generations and for our planet.
https://humanworks.design/


Conscious leadership
“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.” - Rumi
While the world keeps spinning and our world leaders keep playing the ego game, the present and future to create fulfilling, playful and joyful lives lies within ourselves.
With technology and sciences we have the opportunity to solve humanity’s most challenging problems in less than 2 decades. Why is it that we have everything we need to create good lives for everyone, yet we don’t do it? This is arguably the single most important question we humans can ask ourselves at this juncture in time.
It’s wise to observe self and society; do we spend our lives collaborating, creating, cuddling, playing and making beauty, or do we spend it on conflict and competition? When you turn on the TV or go to the movies, how many stories will you see in which there is no conflict? Virtually none. Conflict and drama are what the average human mind gravitates toward — in our entertainment, in our social media, in our conversations, and in our routine mental behaviour. We’re ‘trapped’ in that narrative.
For example Steven Spielberg’s latest movie Ready Player One tries to picture a paradise for everyone in the virtual game; The Oasis. In Oasis you can be anyone you want and do anything you want (limited to your game credits). The movie is a lost opportunity in creating new narratives and instead a repetition of human addictions to suffering. First the only so called heaven is in the virtual world where in the real world, in the Stacks people living in mountains of metal trash, Pizza-delivering drones are buzzing through the foreground to deliver food to lonely people who ignore even their children’s needs to play the game. An enormous video billboard for a haptic suit blares in the background highlighting you need to compete and destroy others to survive in Oasis. And the artificial heaven Oasis is only a cliché replica of dopamine addictions; meeting with strangers for fast shallow interactions hiding who you really are, satisfying your needs of violence addiction in boxing matches, simulated war zones where you encounter with all kinds of beasts and porn addiction in champagne-room stripteases.
Is this really what we want?
And today, why don’t we collaborate to create goodness? More passionately and collectively?
Don’t we want to create the utopia because it’d be boring?
Are we too addicted to our as is ideas and negative emotions?
Don’t we have the courage even to believe such futures are possible?
And how comfortable are we amplifying as is problems using technology and inheriting a toxic culture and thus world to our children?
We know human civilisation needs to be re-structured in a manner that is aligned with the needs of humanity, earthlings and the planet. And for that we need role model conscious leaders to create new cultures combining tradition (of what’s good) with innovation (of what’s possible).
That’s why it’s important to transform ourselves as conscious leaders to create new futures, new cultures, and new models of humanity. To live fulfilling lives as noble and deserving humans.
Contact us for a talk or workshop to innovate your business model with consciousness, with new value propositions, innovation metrics and exponential partnerships based on the values that matters to you and your communities most.
In this weeks newsletter more about children first world design, healthy living, the future of learning, positive news, new visions for society, the future of work and some interesting reads on the social media delirium of the last few weeks.
With love and gratitude.
Have a joyful Sunday.
Canay and Rudy.

human works design activities
and& is a one of a kind summit & festival at the intersection of health, tech & creativity curated for the curious
Children first
How babies learn – and why robots can’t compete
What If All I Want for My Kids Is An Ordinary Life?
It’s Time to Tell Your Kids It Doesn’t Matter Where They Go To College
Why dance class is just as important as math class
Positive news
What went right?
Future of learning
6 Tips on the Future of Learning from Actual Teenage Exponential Thinkers
Assassin's Creed's new life as a virtual museum
The Third Education Revolution
Healthy living
The Disease of Being Busy
How to Be Happy Every Day (TED video)
'Happiest man in the world’ says veganism is the key to happiness
The unstoppable rise of veganism: how a fringe movement went mainstream
Mozilla's Internet Health Report 2018
Why You Should Surround Yourself With More Books Than You'll Ever Have Time to Read
New visions for society
The Relationship Between Money and Happiness
The ecological singularity
The Paradox of Universal Basic Income by Joi Ito
Universal Basic Services (report)
The Truth Machine - In Blockchain We Trust
The wrong assumptions of blockchain
Future of work
The Workplace of the Future
To Take Charge of Your Career, Start by Building Your Tribe
Brian Eno’s Advice for Those Who Want to Do Their Best Creative Work: Don't Get a Job (video)
The Rise Of The Social Enterprise: A New Paradigm For Business
Why Slowing Down Can Actually Help Us Achieve More
Social media delirium
The Last Days of Reality
The new surveillance capitalism
The Era of Fake Video Begins
TED 2018 Is All About Facebook—and Not in a Good Way
This is all the data Facebook and Google have on you
Closing quote
Charlie Chaplin : The Final Speech from The Great Dictator
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