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futuribile / curating futures - Issue #35 - Goodbye planning, welcome place-making

futuribile / curating futures
futuribile / curating futures - Issue #35 - Goodbye planning, welcome place-making
By Marta Arniani • Issue #35 • View online
Aloha,
2020 ratified the end of linear planning. The idea of programming as a reassuring navigation exercise between signposts - a certain revenue threshold, clients, project calendars, but also personal calendars, holidays, celebrations, wrecked. Think of 2020 as an accelerate training on non-deterministic and interdisciplinary thinking, with supporting evidence from a global scale pilot. How to navigate 2021?
T-Factor, a recently launched project I am a partner of, had to deal from day 0 with this impossibility to plan as usual, moreover in a context of urban regeneration planning (double discomfort cheese on top, please). The mission across several European cities is to leverage the time in-between the adoption of a regeneration masterplan and its actual realisation (“life”, as argued by the project officer during our first public event). This time is used to create meanwhile spaces, means of collective place prototyping and learning in light of stable uses and functions. My role there is to curate the exploration of participatory smart city notions.
Collective place-making stands as a solid answer to a multidimensional planning demand. It creates equality and a sense of belonging on a small scale while aligning them on a broader collective interest. It is something urbanism can do effectively only together with other disciplines, and that it should generously lend to different contexts too. What does place-making look like in the digital classroom? And in the remote office? And in the presence of a hospital room? How to inhabit all the meanwhiles generated by technology?
Aloha,
Marta Arniani

Honoured to have been selected by Barcelona's Centre of International Affairs and Banco Santander for their first 35 Under 35 list of Future Leaders!
Honoured to have been selected by Barcelona's Centre of International Affairs and Banco Santander for their first 35 Under 35 list of Future Leaders!
Data empires
The new EU Data Governance Act. Last week, the EU released the first part of its regulatory masterplan on data, which on one side aims not to lose the train on industrial data, and on the other to create a safe environment to share personal data in the public interest. Of course, it is not that simple - my recap and considerations on the social implications here.
Democratic source code. Despite the intent, many non-EU interests are represented in Gaia-X, the project to build a European cloud. A couple of reads around data, infrastructures and the US-EU tech love/hate story: in the first, open source voices push for more strict laws about EU funding, to avoid repeating OpenStack placement on the cloud market. Another take on what to do next is this sketch of a U.S.-EU Tech Alliance.
Meanwhile...
A reporter jumped into an EU Council meeting after a member of Dutch Defense Minister's staff tweeted a picture containing the web address of the meeting 🤦🏻‍♀️
A reporter jumped into an EU Council meeting after a member of Dutch Defense Minister's staff tweeted a picture containing the web address of the meeting 🤦🏻‍♀️
Security
Shall sousveillance become a civil right? Capturing deviant acts by the police is a way to hold power accountable and to amplify the voices of the oppressed. The French government does not think this is valuable and is trying to prevent citizens from filming the police. IHMO this is not a French affair, but an occasion for a debate about surveillance - and sousveillance as civil right of the digital society.
Blinded by the QR. In the current numbing of the sense of touch, QR Codes made a great comeback. The problem is that they are not secure at all. AI experts also warn on China’s QR code system against Covid-19, which is a disguised form of citizens ranking.
Shots
///#MakeAmazonPay is the largest international mobilisation of Amazon workers so far.
/// A gift guide to Christmas’ creepiest surveillance gadgets.
/// Meet your new browsing friend: Simple Search (it cuts Google’s content from search results).
/// FTX: Safety Reboot is a feminist training curriculum on digital safety.
/// DeepMind learned to predict protein’s 3D shape from its amino-acid sequence - something molecular biologists have been struggling with for 50 years. Let’s hope it does not become a transhumanists’ playground.
Oh, dear!
Adrian Smith
Here’s a very 2020 thing I just learned about myself: this picture of the 8-year-old, 3rd grade version of me has been a meme FOR YEARS!!!!!!!!!!!!

Like, there’s merch and everything. Internet is weird. thread 👇 https://t.co/4oUVjz5FEK
That’s all! Thanks for reading, hit reply for feedback and forward/share to support my work.
Aloha,
Marta
Did you enjoy this issue?
Marta Arniani

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