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futuribile / curating futures - Issue #34 - Blockchain chicken farms and other automated wonders

futuribile / curating futures
futuribile / curating futures - Issue #34 - Blockchain chicken farms and other automated wonders
By Marta Arniani • Issue #34 • View online
Aloha,
I had my first experience teaching to a class of master students. I loved it (besides speaking 3 hours with a mask 😵)! I presented my work on the gender aspects of automating public services at the MA in Algorithmic Right and Data Governance of the University of Nice. My objective was to give students a feminism lens to approach public ADMS implementation and evaluation, a lens that can be integrated into their future practice. We discussed feminist theories, case studies and worked on possible solutions to concrete discrimination problems. It was in French, but I am happy to propose it again and adapt it elsewhere in English or Italian (in Spanish could do an evening event with a glass). Degrees on emerging “tech & society” topics like this one or the Digital Services Act Observatory at Amsterdam Law School (which is hiring a researcher) give me an enormous hope that in the near future we will handle digitalisation better. Meanwhile, the second report of the Digital Future Society series on the gender aspects of digital welfare is out with juicy design suggestions.
Aloha,
Marta Arniani

Window Swap: the Tinder of window views
Window Swap: the Tinder of window views
A day into the automated society
Automating Society report 2020. Journalists and experts from across Europe contributed to the new Algorithm Watch annual bible about automated decision making systems deployment in 16 countries. In one year, their usage increased exponentially. While ADMS already affect all sorts of activities and judgments, they are still mainly deployed without any meaningful democratic debate. My notes here.
The culture behind it. The integration of an AI system creates breakages in social structures that must be repaired in order for the technology to work as intended: it is the bottom-line of a study of integrating AI in clinical care. Bianca Wylie argues that there is an imagination problem around public non-commercial tech potential: because of it, we lose out commercially too. “This is the irony: much like the public infrastructure that supports so many more commercial activities (roads, water, etc.) so too could public digital infrastructure”.
A sample of the imagination problem I find online when I search for a picture for a blog post about blockchain...🙄
A sample of the imagination problem I find online when I search for a picture for a blog post about blockchain...🙄
Blockchain ta mère
The damn blockchain for good. The European Science Hub released the ultimate compass about Distributed ledger technologies for social and public good. The report maps 131 blockchain projects, accounting for aspects like sector, country, legal entity form and gender balance. My digest here. (BTW: P2PModels, the organisation of the principal author Samer Hassan, is hiring for a postdoc and a PhD in computer science in Madrid).
Blockchain chicken farms. You are a farmer. In China. How do you convince your clients that your chickens are truly wandering around free and happy? Well, equipping them with a “chicken Fitbit” and working with a tech start-up to record the data on a blockchain. You can find this story and other accounts of how technology is transforming the lives of China’s rural poor in Xiaowei Wang’s book.
Shots
/// Open source antidote: a reading list of critical and alternative views on free and open source software.
/// The European quantum computing startup landscape. #QuantumTaMère
/// The Huawei war: a profile of 5G geopolitical challenges by Evgeny Morozov.
/// How Humans Judge Machines compares the reactions of people to scenarios describing human and machine actions.
/// An analysis through the “crap detector” of McKinsey’s overly servile report “Digital Public Services: How to achieve fast transformation at scale” (#KeywordsCombo).
Oh, dear!
GPT-3, the most complex language model ever trained, didn't perform well in a study about its application in healthcare scenarios
GPT-3, the most complex language model ever trained, didn't perform well in a study about its application in healthcare scenarios
That’s all! Thanks for reading, hit reply for feedback and forward/share to support my work.
Aloha,
Marta
Did you enjoy this issue?
Marta Arniani

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