View profile

Have you found it yet?

Think. Write. Lead.
Have you found it yet?
By Diego Pineda • Issue #6 • View online
Happy new year, my friend! Welcome to the last issue of 2021 of Think.Write.Lead. For us here in the Northern Hemisphere is getting really cold. So grab a hot cuppa and enjoy!

On Christmas day I drove through a blizzard to go to the movies.
Well, it wasn’t that bad on the way there (although it had snowed all night on Christmas eve) but it was picking up badly on the way home.
The pavement was slippery and visibility low.
The car skidded a few times on the ice and my teenage son went whoa! a few times in the back seat.
All for a chance to watch the new Matrix movie on the big screen.
My wife says that it has already been established. My son agrees.
My wife says that it has already been established. My son agrees.
No worries, I’m not going to spoil it for you, nor bore you with my opinions about the movie (I’m not a film critic).
But I want to extract some lessons from the experience of watching it.
The hero of the saga, Neo, is known as “the one” (Neo = One, get it?), the prophesied savior of the humans fighting against the machines in a post-apocalyptic world.
They had been searching for him for years, until they found him.
And getting him out of the Matrix and into the real world was no easy task.
And do you know what this reminds me of? Of solopreneurs and writers struggling to find “the one” – their niche. 
“The riches are in the niches,” we hear the biz gurus say.
“Writers should write with a particular person in mind,” us writing folks say.
And people get all worked up by this advice and go out into a blizzard to find their niche.
Just like a car in snow-covered streets where you can’t see the lines or the traffic signs, they wander and spin in circles.
Why?
Because…
1. They fear they will leave money on the table if they narrow down their audience too much.
So they write for everybody and nobody, there is no personalization in their messaging, and their posts never stand out.
2. They have multiple passions and are not able to choose one or two topics to write about.
So they write random content about a myriad of things and people have a hard time deciding if they should follow them.
3. They overthink it and come up with a lot of “what-if scenarios” in their minds.
So they keep worrying and procrastinating, never making a decision.
If this is you, let me give you some driving advice.
When your car is skidding on ice, you have to ease off the accelerator or brake and put the transmission in neutral. Then you steer in the direction you want to go, very gently. That’s how you regain control.
So, instead of trying to find your niche, let your niche find you.
Don’t rush. Don’t stop.
Just do the following.
THINK.
Here are two exercises to try out.
1. Find your passion
  • What are ten things that you are curious about?
  • Do any of those ideas intersect or have something in common?
  • Which intersections between ideas make you feel excited?
2. Find your “hedgehog”
  • What is something you would write about all the time for free?
  • How can you make money out of it?
  • Do you know enough about it to be considered an expert?
Read this article to see an explanation and a breakdown of the hedgehog method.
WRITE.
The exercises above will help you define a couple of topics you can write about.
Got the topics? Great!
Now, do this:
  • Write a series of 5 - 7 posts or tweets (wherever your audience is) about each topic.
  • Publish about one topic once a day for a week and then do the same for the other topic the following week.
  • After the two weeks pass, check the analytics of the posts (you can use SHIELD for LinkedIn) and see which topic resonated more with your audience and who are the people who engaged with your posts.
LEAD.
When I started posting about book writing and publishing I thought my niche were C-executives and business leaders.
But when I looked at the people who liked and commented on my posts (visiting their profiles and connecting with them), I realized they were mostly solopreneurs, coaches, and consultants.
So I began writing for them.
That’s how my niche found me.
Now I’m creating tons of content for them, including my upcoming book, The Solo Thought Leader: From Solopreneur to Go-To Expert in 7 Steps.
Now it’s your turn to enter the Matrix, find your niche, and lead them with the power of the written word.
Did you enjoy this issue?
Diego Pineda

Write like a thought leader: tight, sexy, and elegant copy that stirs emotions and changes minds.

Subscribe if you want weekly power pills to attract, persuade, and make an impact with your writing.

So enter your best email and click Subscribe Now. Or don't, but do not complain later that your writing sucks and you can't get any traction. You had your chance.

In order to unsubscribe, click here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue