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StorySherpa: Next-Day Disinformation

Amazon pushes people to the limit. China uses social networks to distribute their messaging on protes
StorySherpa: Next-Day Disinformation
By Yury Molodtsov • Issue #58 • View online
Amazon pushes people to the limit. China uses social networks to distribute their messaging on protests.

Amazon’s Next-Day Delivery Has Brought Chaos And Carnage To America’s Streets — But The World’s Biggest Retailer Has A System To Escape The Blame
China sows Hong Kong disinformation using Twitter porn accounts
How Sketch Took on Adobe by Making a Faster, Leaner, Cheaper Image Editor
The Hidden Costs of Automated Thinking
Student Debt Is Transforming the American Family
Teens are shunning WeChat, showing shifting tastes in Chinese social media
25 Years of WIRED Predictions: Why the Future Never Arrives
Researchers Easily Trick Cylance's AI-Based Antivirus Into Thinking Malware Is 'Goodware'
Birdbox
First, enterprise software got more consumer, now should we expect consumer software to become more enterprisy?
Li Jin
Thread: New tools are emerging and focusing on *consumers* first. That's because consumers today aspire to become businesses tomorrow.
I’ll dub this the "Enterprization of consumer."
4:25 PM - 5 Sep 2019
Another very simple explanation of what machine learning is (and isn’t).
Benedict Evans
10:32 PM - 30 Aug 2019
The co-founder of Basecamp started a very loud discussion on Google’s dominance in search and what does it lead to for small businesses.
Jason Fried
When Google puts 4 paid ads ahead of the first organic result for your own brand name, you’re forced to pay up if you want to be found. It’s a shakedown. It’s ransom. But at least we can have fun with it. Search for Basecamp and you may see this attached ad. https://t.co/c0oYaBuahL
1:39 PM - 3 Sep 2019
Some loyalty programs are useful, but some have been very helpful to their creators.
Tanay Jaipuria
Starbucks has $1.2B in total unredeemed value on Starbucks cards which is like a 0% loan from customers

It also recognized ~145M (12%) as card breakages, i.e. the value customers aren't expected to redeem

So essentially Starbucks is borrowing money from customers at -12%/yr 🤯
8:03 PM - 26 Aug 2019
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Yury Molodtsov

I'm an Investor at Day One Ventures, a venture capital firm that invests in tech startups and leads their communications.

Here I look at tech news I find important and the future they might lead us.

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