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Overview Timelapse Feature - Paris

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Paris is often called the “City of Light,” a name that originates from its implementation and illumin
 
October 19 · Issue #1080 · View online
Daily Overview
Paris is often called the “City of Light,” a name that originates from its implementation and illumination of 56,000 gas lamps in the 1860s. Today, the city receives half of its energy (and its light) from nearby energy plants that simultaneously generate electricity and heat (called “cogeneration”). Thirty-five percent of the city’s power is generated by the Nogent Nuclear Power Plant. Nationally, France gets 75 percent of its power from nuclear plants. The remainder of Paris’s energy comes primarily from trash incineration (9 percent) and methane gas (5 percent). Solar and wind power combined contribute 0.1 percent of the energy that provides powers to the city’s 2.1 million residents.
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48.856613°, 2.352222°

Source imagery: NASA / Planet

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