Currently — November 5th, 2021

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The weather, currently.
Prof. Stefan Rahmstorf 🌏
In Europe, the summer 2021 was the hottest since at least 1500 AD.

Before the 1990s such a hot summer had a chance of less than 1 in 10,000 years.

But since the 1990s, the expected frequency has rocketed to reach once every three years.

https://t.co/ZNKlRuSqhn https://t.co/9qyVjKu6FU
2021 was Europe’s hottest summer on record. Average temperatures were about 1C above normal, leading to heatwaves, fires, and other disasters. According to scientists, this kind of heat is an almost impossible occurrence without the influence of climate change.
“The new study is another stark reminder of just what 1.2C [of global heating to date] means,” said Friederike Otto, a scientist from the Imperial College London, in an interview with the Guardian.
What you need to know, currently.
Brandon Rittiman
"There's a tree on the line that started a fire."

LISTEN to the PG&E worker who was first to see the flames of the #DixieFire. 👇

Today, he says he's not sure what started the fire.

Here's what he said back then.

Does he sound unsure to you?

@ABC10

https://t.co/EANSXZKlTG
PG&E is facing a federal probe and at least 10 lawsuits related to its possible role in igniting the Dixie Fire. Lawsuits allege that PG&E’s equipment started the fire and that the company was aware of the risk. 
PG&E has previously stated that their equipment may have been involved in sparking the fire. Currently, the company estimates that it will pay $1.15 billion in losses from the fire.
The Dixie Fire, spurred on by climate change, amounted to the second-largest fire in California history. The fire burned over 100 structures and more than 1,500 square miles. — Abbie Veitch
That's it! Be sure to follow Currently on Twitter:
Currently
Right now is the time to show up for climate.

Right now, as in today, this week.

#NoClimateNoDeal https://t.co/0biEmDTGtD
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