The last "platform" diagram you'll ever need - Coté's Commonplace Book - Issue #66

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The last "platform" diagram you'll ever need - Coté's Commonplace Book - Issue #66
By Coté • Issue #66 • View online
The last “platform” diagram you’ll ever need, chop the first paragraph. Scroll all the way down for two secret videos about kubernetes.

Grind!
Grind!
How to build apps to run on kubernetes
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A Good "Platform" Diagram
I’m always looking for good diagrams of a “developer platform,” an “internal platform,” whatever you want to call that stuff you run on-top of kubernetes. Here’s a good one from Forrester, from a webinar I did with them earlier this year:
Source: “The Adaptive Enterprise: Can Your Application Platform Cope with a Crisis?” Forrester, et. al., Jan 2022.
Source: “The Adaptive Enterprise: Can Your Application Platform Cope with a Crisis?” Forrester, et. al., Jan 2022.
Axe the intro paragraph analogy if you don't refer back to it
Often, when you’re writing about tech stuff, you’ll make a reference to some mainstream culture thing. Well, or, like, science fiction, you know, I, Robot and stuff. You might also make an analogy to cars, road systems, whatever.
Here’s one making an analogy between traffic laws and enterprise governance:
Dotting the landscape of the world’s highways and freeways are signs declaring the speed limit. While these limits vary based on geography, population density, and from country to country, they are a shared concept in that speed controls correlate with safety. 
In tech writing, using analogies to real life stuff is great. Software and governance concepts are so conceptual that it’s a good start. However, in writing, if you don’t come back to that analogy, you should cut it. For example, if the text after this opening paragraph comes back to “you know, like speed laws that are adapted to the regional context they’re in,” leave the text in. But, if you never return to that analogy, just cut it and start with the tech stuff.
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More from the State of Kubernetes 2022 survey
I’m still putting together some videos highlighting as few points on of our upcoming survey. Here’s some WIP videos just for you, dear newsletter subscribers: how many clusters people run, multi-cloud findings, and the security one.
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