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Ci Newsletter #13: Chemical valentines & Olympic doping

Andy @ Compound Interest
Andy @ Compound Interest
Welcome to the latest Ci newsletter! A slightly shorter one this fortnight, but packed with belated Valentine’s Day chemistry, a topical explainer on doping in sports, and a guide to the chemistry behind red cabbage indicators.

A chemical valentine's day
Compound Interest
More #ValentinesDay chemistry! Here's a look at some of the key chemicals involved in feelings of love 💕 #ValentinesDay2022 https://t.co/6SoYJ7Q1tj
Yes, Valentine’s may have been yesterday, but I spent painstaking time updating the above graphic to include the structure of oxytocin, so you’d better believe I’m going to mention it anyway.
More pertinently, there’s this edition of Periodic Graphics from a few years back in C&EN which explains how to keep your Valentine’s Day flowers blooming for longer.
Click to view and download this graphic on the C&EN site
Click to view and download this graphic on the C&EN site
Doping at the Olympics
In what’s becoming an increasingly regular occurrence, the Olympics are taking place and we’re talking about Russian doping again. For starters, here’s a guide I put together on doping in sports the last time we were having this conversation:
Click to view and download this graphic on the Ci site
Click to view and download this graphic on the Ci site
For a specific discussion of the current case, and the flaws in the latest defence of it, here’s an excellent thread that gives an idea of why trimetazidine is used and why the current defence for its presence is shaky at best:
Justin Brower
Russian skater Valieva's lawyer put out the old "grandfather spit in a glass of water" defense for her positive trimetazidine doping result. It is beyond ridiculous. It's Tox Tuesday, so let's unpack the drug and this ridiculousness. A longish thread, 1/? https://t.co/KynujmGNEk
National cabbage day
It’s National Cabbage Day this Thursday (17 Feb) which seems like as good an excuse as any to make red cabbage indicator. If you’ve never tried making it, the graphic below includes a handy guide as well as a brief explanation of the chemistry involved.
Click to view and download this graphic on the Ci site
Click to view and download this graphic on the Ci site
Chemistry news & features
The carbon footprint of asthma inhalers
A century of curly arrows
Fake snow – the science of how it's made and how it affects performance
How Paxlovid was developed
I’ve got a few more new graphics in the works at the moment, so next fortnight’s newsletter should be a bumper edition to compensate for this slightly shorter one. As always, please share the newsletter if you enjoy it, and feel free to reach out to me with any comments or suggestions.
Thanks for reading,
Andy
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Andy @ Compound Interest
Andy @ Compound Interest @compoundchem

Topical chemistry graphics and other interesting chemistry-related nuggets from across the web. Sent fortnightly.

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