View profile

The Newsletter's New Clothes

Hey guys! As you probably noticed, the layout of this newsletter is quite different from before. I'm
The Newsletter's New Clothes
By Cherie Hu • Issue #1 • View online
Hey guys! As you probably noticed, the layout of this newsletter is quite different from before. I’m trying out a new platform called Revue because it feels a lot sleeker and easier to use/read than TinyLetter. Let me know what you think!
To open this installment, here’s one of my favorite quotes from design legend John Maeda:
Artists comfortably work within and with the many enigmas in life — sharing their research … as concrete evidence of a different path taken.
Based on this definition, anyone can and should be an artist.

Writing:
After the Forbes Celebrity 100 rush, I’ve returned back to reflecting on innovation in the music ecosystem. I started a new series on the YouTube-music debate, and wrote about celebrities’ ambivalent relationships with technology. Would love to hear your thoughts/feedback on any of these pieces!
The YouTube-Music Feud, Part 1: Why "$3 Billion To Rights Holders" Means Nothing
How Kanye West Broke Music Journalism
The Best Live Event Technology Needs To Listen To Fans, Not Lock Up Their Phones
Events: OZY Fusion Fest
Last weekend, I had a blast at the inaugural OZY Fusion Fest, a menagerie of music, food, pop culture and activism in the heart of Central Park. OZY is one of many magazines venturing into the live festival spaceNew York Magazine holds the Vulture Festival every year, Entertainment Weekly is hosting its first-ever Popfest in October, and Complex is hosting its inaugural ComplexCon in November. I’m investigating the motivations behind and trajectory of this trend for an upcoming article.
In advertising OZY Fusion Fest, OZY aggressively pushed forward the mantra “THINKING IS A LOST ART.” Indeed, the world is so diverse, yet many of us seem to be consuming news and information with even more discretion (read: prejudice), embracing echo chambers, thinking narrowly rather than openly. Life becomes most exciting in the form of a giant game of connect-the-dots, a quest for common ground, rather than for conflict or isolation.
In this vein, the OZY lineup was super eclectic; at one point, Senator Cory Booker was giving a talk about inequality on my left, Top Chef Alex Guarnaschelli was doing a dessert demo on my right, the XQ Super School Movement was advocating for high-school reform behind me, and in front of me was neo-soul singer Andra Day belting her heart out onstage. It was reminiscent of Pop-Up Magazine, except tailored for the quintessentially scatterbrained, idea-hungry OZY staff writers and audiences.
The entrance poster, just as colorful and crazy as the programming itself.
The entrance poster, just as colorful and crazy as the programming itself.
That's legendary producer Wyclef Jean onstage. At one point, an audience member gave him a piggyback ride as he exclaimed "I'm the Haitian Frank Sinatra for real, y'all."
That's legendary producer Wyclef Jean onstage. At one point, an audience member gave him a piggyback ride as he exclaimed "I'm the Haitian Frank Sinatra for real, y'all."
Heather Day, a San Francisco-based artist, painting a mural in real time at the festival.
Heather Day, a San Francisco-based artist, painting a mural in real time at the festival.
Questions:
  1. What do you own? Not in the literal/tangible sense. Do you think you have ownership over your future? Your personality? Your career? Your motivation? Your comfort zone? Your public image? Should you own these things, or are they better left out of your control?
  2. What music do you always “go back to”? In other words, what songs or artists do you keep listening to over and over again, and why? I found out this week that the music I keep going back to is also the music that some of my friends and colleagues hate with a fiery passion (anything in hip-hop/rap). That got me wondering what it takes for a song to become a piece of nutrition, a medicinal herb, a prescription, that you can’t go a day without. I’ve come to the vague conclusion that I always go back to music that makes me feel confident and/or safe (if you’re interested in hearing what that combination sounds like, check out my Spotify playlist “good songs NOW”).
Recommended reads & vids:
Entrepreneurship Is Not the Answer
There is no difference between computer art and human art
Bo Burnham's Inspirational Advice: Give Up Now
Sam Smith - I'm Not the Only One (Thirdstory Cover)
Where you can find me next:
  • RightsTech Summit in NYC, 7/26 (today!)
  • Boston & Cambridge, 7/30–7/31
  • San Francisco, 8/5–8/7
Obligatory potato:
Chicago Cubs pitcher Jason Hammel’s doctor apparently prescribed potato chips to cure the baseball player’s stomach cramps. If only that could work for me…
Did you enjoy this issue?
Cherie Hu

Cherie's updates at the intersection of music, technology, creativity, business, people, travel and potatoes.

If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here
Powered by Revue