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🌻 TWiB June 27, 2022

The Week in Botany
This weekend I’m in an isolated cottage, looking down the valley of the Afon Dulas. It takes a bit of skill to look down, as the valley is crammed between a few tight mountains that rise up above the cottage on either side. The river disappears among the trees that escort the river banks as it rounds a bend. Closer to, the cottage’s owner has planted a fantastic display of foxgloves that are trying to remain upright in the wind. A bit further in the distance, a red kite is flying backwards. I thought that was something only hummingbirds could do, but it shows what you can achieve with a strong enough wind.
I’ve been sorting out documentation this week. Ideally, you do this as you work - but when things get busy I tend to drop it and try to catch up later. I’ve found a few notes that look like good ideas, so we’ll have to see if we can catch up with them once the new editors start.
I should also remind you that Annals of Botany are looking for a Social Media Secretary who’ll also be working with us a little bit. The deadline is July 1, so you’ll need to get your application in soon.
I’ll be back home this week, so another email should be with you at the same time next week. Until then, take care.
Alun (webmaster@botany.one)

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Scientific Papers
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First record of functional underground traps in a pitcher plant: Nepenthes pudica (Nepenthaceae), a new species from North Kalimantan, Borneo
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