View profile

Book Freak Issue #87: How to Breath

Revue
 
 

Book Freak

June 7 · Issue #87 · View online

Short pieces of advice from books


Four pieces of advice Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art  by James Nestor
Modern research is showing us that making even slight adjustments to the way we inhale and exhale can jump-start athletic performance; rejuvenate internal organs; halt snoring, asthma, and autoimmune disease; and even straighten scoliotic spines. None of this should be possible, and yet it is. Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, Breath turns the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function on its head. You will never breathe the same again.

Choose which nostril to breathe through
“The right nostril is a gas pedal. When you’re inhaling primarily through this channel, circulation speeds up, your body gets hotter, and cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate all increase. This happens because breathing through the right side of the nose activates the sympathetic nervous system, the “fight or flight” mechanism that puts the body in a more elevated state of alertness and readiness. Breathing through the right nostril will also feed more blood to the opposite hemisphere of the brain, specifically to the prefrontal cortex, which has been associated with logical decisions, language, and computing. Inhaling through the left nostril has the opposite effect: it works as a kind of brake system to the right nostril’s accelerator. The left nostril is more deeply connected to the parasympathetic nervous system, the rest-and-relax side that lowers blood pressure, cools the body, and reduces anxiety. Left-nostril breathing shifts blood flow to the opposite side of the prefrontal cortex, to the area that influences creative thought and plays a role in the formation of mental abstractions and the production of negative emotions.”
Avoid mouthbreathing
“Mouthbreathing, it turns out, changes the physical body and transforms airways, all for the worse. Inhaling air through the mouth decreases pressure, which causes the soft tissues in the back of the mouth to become loose and flex inward, creating less space and making breathing more difficult. Mouthbreathing begets more mouthbreathing.”
Decongest your nose
“Sit up straight and exhale a soft breath, then pinch both nostrils shut. Try to keep your mind off the breathholding; shake your head up and down or side to side; go for a quick walk, or jump and run. Once you feel a very potent sense of air hunger, take a very slow and controlled breath in through the nose. (If the nose is still congested, breathe softly through the mouth with pursed lips.) Continue this calm, controlled breathing for at least 30 seconds to 1 minute. Repeat all these steps six times.”
Tape your mouth shut
“Nasal breathing alone can boost nitric oxide sixfold, which is one of the reasons we can absorb about 18 percent more oxygen than by just breathing through the mouth. Mouth taping, Burhenne said, helped a five-year-old patient of his overcome ADHD, a condition directly attributed to breathing difficulties during sleep. It helped Burhenne and his wife cure their own snoring and breathing problems. Hundreds of other patients reported similar benefits.”
UNCLASSIFIED ADS
Buy a Book Freak Unclassified ad for $50 and reach 9,740 readers!
***
What books make people feel hopeful? Check out dozens of recommendations, curated by a worldwide community of curious minds.
***
Get the most out of what you read. Readwise makes it easy to revisit and learn from your ebook & article highlights.
***
Setapp is a hand-picked collection of quality software, packed with prime apps. There’s no store — just a folder on the Mac, and no hidden costs — just a flat monthly fee. It’s simple and users love it.
***
Book Freak is published by Cool Tools Lab, a small company of three people. We run the Cool Tools website, a video review YouTube channel, and other newsletters, including Gareth’s Tips, Tools, and Shop TalesWhat’s in my bag? and Recomendo. You can support our work by becoming a patron via Patreon
Thanks for reading Book Freak! If you like it, please share it with a friend.
Did you enjoy this issue?
In order to unsubscribe, click here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue
Book Freak is copyrighted by Cool Tools Lab, LLC. Commissions may be earned from the links above.