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Big Revolution - The official launch issue!

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Hello! After a couple of weeks in development with a small group of testers (thanks testers!), Big Re
 
March 14 · Issue #17 · View online
Big Revolution
Hello! After a couple of weeks in development with a small group of testers (thanks testers!), Big Revolution has launched. 
Feel free to hit reply to this email and let me know what you think.
Martin.

Big things you need to know today
Image credit: Xocoyotzin via Wikimedia Commons
- Stephen Hawking has died. I awoke by chance at 3.45am and immediately received the news by push notification. Sad news to hear at any time, in any dimension.
- YouTube has a refreshingly simple approach to dealing with conspiracy theory videos – it’s going to link to Wikipedia articles underneath them. The news comes as the spotlight increasingly shines on the platform’s role in spreading propaganda and extremist material.
- Facebook plans to offer video news reports in the USA. The reports, created by third-party publishers, will be available in the company’s Watch section, according to Axios. It’s the latest development in Facebook’s awkward to-and-fro relationship with news media. 
- Elon Musk appears to be getting into satire. According to The Daily Beast, he’s hired former Onion writers to work on a mystery project. Or maybe Tesla press releases are just going to become a lot funnier.
- TechCrunch has officially launched its new design. It’s got a ‘Medium meets Bloomberg’ vibe. Nice and simple.
The big thought
Image credit: jesse orrico on Unsplash
Life after death
The most-shared link in my Twitter feed yesterday was almost certainly the story of Nectome, a startup that wants to upload people’s brains to a computer… after killing them.
The premise shows even the more extreme fantasies in Black Mirror aren’t necessarily that far away. 
“The idea is that someday in the future scientists will scan your bricked brain and turn it into a computer simulation. That way, someone a lot like you, though not exactly you, will smell the flowers again in a data server somewhere,” writes MIT Technology Review.
I’m generally an early adopter, but even if this worked on living people (and there’s no proof it works at all yet) I think I’ve finally found some technology I would’t try. Maybe I’m a traditionalist, but I believe our memories and personalities should die at the same time as our bodies.
Sure, maybe your ‘digital ghost’ will have a good time in a Sim City-like virtual world in decades to come, but it’s not actually you. There’s an argument that this could help with the grieving process after someone dies, but is that really healthy in the long run?
In all, it feels a little egotistical to inflict a simulation of yourself on the world so you can have a vague approximation of everlasting life. 
You can read more about Nectome on its website.
One big read
How Conservative Activists Catfished Twitter How Conservative Activists Catfished Twitter
Project Veritas is an ‘investigative journalism’ project that has developed a name for secretly filming 'liberals,’ often presenting the resulting videos out of context, as supposed 'evidence’ of how terrible 'the left’ is.
This piece by Kashmir Hill looks at the group’s underhand tactics – just one more front in the ongoing culture war as politics in the West becomes increasingly polarised.
One big tweet
Should you fire people via Twitter? A primer for Donald Trump:
Dieter Bohn
People I would be willing to fire via tweet:

1. Literally nobody, ever. There's a minimum level of respect all people, even awful people, deserve.
2. Okay I lied maybe one person but I can't fire him because he's the president of the united states
2:42 PM - 13 Mar 2018
That’s all for today...
See you tomorrow, folks!
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