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Wait! What? There were Black Confederate Soldiers? (Part 2)

Black History Quiz
Wait! What? There were Black Confederate Soldiers? (Part 2)
By Jim Stroud • Issue #97 • View online
Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues post on Sundays at 7:30 am EST.

TRIGGER WARNING
Last year, I posted and tweeted about black confederate soldiers. This response I received ranged from accusations of my posting disinformation to my being a tool of white supremacy. I received multiple private requests to delete the information I posted due to the “harmful effects” of the subject matter. I refused then and am now adding additional research. This is 2nd in a series on Black Confederate Soldiers. They did exist. Enjoy. (Or… not.)
CONFEDERATE SOLDIER: HOLT COLLIER
Holt Collier ⋆ Thomas Jay Warren, Sculptor
Holt Collier ⋆ Thomas Jay Warren, Sculptor
Collier was born circa 1848 as a slave in Mississippi and was the third generation to serve the Hinds family on Plum Ridge Plantation, built by General Thomas Hinds, who was a veteran of the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. At the request of General Andrew Jackson, Hinds had surveyed central Mississippi and chose the site for the state capital, Jackson, before settling nearby in the area which is now Hinds County.
Collier killed his first bear at the age of ten; thereafter, his job was to supply meat for the table of the Hinds family and the field hands. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, Collier’s master Howell Hinds and his seventeen-year-old son Tom, who was Collier’s childhood companion, left for the war. Although told by his master that he was too young to fight, Collier stowed away on a riverboat and joined Howell and his son in Memphis, Tennessee.
At the 1862 Battle of Shiloh in western Tennessee, Collier witnessed the death of Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston. Collier’s biographer says that although there was a prohibition against blacks serving in uniform, Confederates made an exception for Collier because of his demonstrable skills. Collier stayed with the Hinds men until later being given the opportunity to ride with the 9th Texas Cavalry Regiment. He served in Company I through the rest of the war and fought in Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee.
Holt Collier
Holt Collier
After the war Collier returned home to the Hinds family. During Reconstruction, Collier was tried by a military tribunal in Vicksburg for the murder of a white man, Captain James King. After his acquittal, Collier left the state upon the advice of William Alexander Percy of Greenville, who was later the last U.S. senator from Mississippi elected by a state legislature.
Collier worked as a cowboy on the ranch owned by his former commander, General and later Governor of Texas Lawrence Sullivan Ross, the namesake of Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas and savior of Texas A & M University. Upon the murder of Collier’s former master, Howell Hinds, Collier returned to Greenville for the funeral and resided there for the remainder of his life.
THE LEGACY OF HOLT COLLIER
Although his name is not famous, he played a pivotal role in the invention of a toy that children still enjoy to this day. Can you guess what that toy is?
BLACK HISTORY TODAY
Netflix to Debut Italy’s First TV Show With a Majority Black Cast - The New York Times
Kimberly Godwin is about to be the first Black person to run a major US broadcast network newsroom
Air Force Academy renaming building after distinguished Airman and first African American to pilot a spacecraft - KRDO
FREE EBOOK
Racism Reimagined: How Critical Race Theory Imperils the American Workplace, by Jim Stroud
BHQ ANSWER
Without Holt Collier there would be no “Teddy Bears.”
Holt Collier killed more than three thousand bears during his lifetime, more than those taken by Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone combined. Such was Collier’s fame among big-game hunters that Major George M. Helm asked him to serve as President Theodore Roosevelt’s tracker during his famous Mississippi bear hunt of 1902.
The hunt was very high profile, attended by noted big-game hunters, among whom was John Avery McIlhenny of Avery Island, Louisiana, who had served with Roosevelt in the Rough Riders during the Spanish–American War. Numerous reporters were among the entourage. [source: Wikipedia]
So, where does the “teddy bear” come into play? Watch this short video for more on that.
Focused on Mississippi: The story of Holt Collier
Focused on Mississippi: The story of Holt Collier
For further study:
Blacks in Gray Uniforms: A New Look at the South's Most Forgotten Combat Troops 1861-1865
Black Confederates Paperback
Black Confederates In The U.S. Civil War: A Compiled List of African  Americans Who Served The Confederacy: Rodri­guez, Ricardo J.
Black Southerners in Confederate Armies: A Collection of Historical Accounts
Forgotten Confederates: An Anthology About Black Southerners (Journal of Confederate History Series, Vol. XIV)
And I'll just leave this here...
Did you enjoy this issue?
Jim Stroud

Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues post on Sundays at 7:30 am EST. | www.blackhistoryquiz.com

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