View profile

The Black Victorians

Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the
Black History Quiz
The Black Victorians
By Jim Stroud • Issue #70 • View online
Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues post on Sundays. | www.blackhistoryquiz.com

A British Gentleman During The Victorian Era
A British Gentleman During The Victorian Era
THE HISTORY OF BLACK PEOPLE IN BRITAIN certainly goes back a long way - well before the reign of Queen Victoria. There were Black people in Britain in Roman times, and there has been a continuous Black presence in Britain since 1555. For Shakespeare’s London audiences, Black faces would have been a familiar sight.
The eighteenth century saw a great expansion in Britain’s Black population. After the War of the Spanish Succession in 1713, British slavers dominated the infamous Atlantic slave trade. Some slaves were landed and sold at London, Liverpool or Bristol, but many Black people were brought as domestic servants by returning sea-captains, colonial administrators and plantation owners. For the English aristocracy and the newly rich, a Black page or handmaiden was an asset to be shown off as evidence of exotic wealth, so in the 18th century Black people were ironically more evident in the art and writing of the time than they were to be in the early Victorian period.
By the 1760s, the Black population had grown to somewhere between 20,000 and 40,000; Granville Sharp estimated the number of black servants in London alone at 20,000, in a city of 676,250 people. Many had attained freedom - or run away from their masters.
British Blacks of The Victorian Era
British Blacks of The Victorian Era
In 1772, Lord Chief Justice Mansfield’s historic decision in the case of runaway John Somerset ruled that a slave could not be deported from Britain against his or her will. This was the beginning of the end of slavery in Britain itself, and an encouragement to Black people and to abolitionist campaigners.
Q: When did Britain officially end slavery?
Please support my Amazon habit!
I would like to buy more history books to support my research. If you would, click here and leave a tip in my virtual tip jar. Please and thank you.
Any and all tips are appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Any and all tips are appreciated. Thanks in advance.
BHQ Answer
The Higdon Family [1898]
The Higdon Family [1898]
The abolition of slavery was confirmed in 1806 by an Act of Parliament.
And FYI…
As the 18th century drew to a close, Britain’s Black population was well established, breaking free from slavery - but usually very poor, sometimes destitute. The first-generation immigrants were overwhelmingly male, supplemented by arrivals of Black sailors, plus 4,000 Black refugees who had fought for George III against the American Revolution. Black people integrated and intermarried into poor white urban populations, and entered the nineteenth century sharing in the misery and historical anonymity of the British poor. [source]
For further study…
James Somerset, the Boston Runaway Who Ended Slavery in England - New England Historical Society
Black Victorians, Black Victoriana Amazon.com: Books
Black Victorians - GetFunWith
Did you enjoy this issue?
Jim Stroud

Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues post on Sundays. | www.blackhistoryquiz.com

If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue