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Revenge of the Negro Lawn Jockeys

Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the
Black History Quiz
Revenge of the Negro Lawn Jockeys
By Jim Stroud • Issue #27 • View online
Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues on Sundays at 6:00 pm EST.

The Lawn Jockey is seen in the South and in the Appalacian’s of the United States. Many have been destroyed because of the thinking that they are a racial slur to African-Americans. But is this true?
The River Road African American Museum in Louisiana tells us that lawn jockeys represent nothing of the sort, rather they show us a proud moment in U.S. history.
The story begins the icy night in December 1776 when General George Washington decided to cross the Delaware River to launch a surprise attack on the British forces at Trenton. A twelve-year-old African-American sought to fight the Redcoats but Washington deemed him too young and ordered him to look after the horses instead and requested that he keep a lantern blazing along the Delaware so the company would know where to return after battle.
Many hours later, Washington and his men returned to their horses who were tied up to the young boy they left behind. He had frozen to death with the lantern still clenched in his fist. Washington was so moved by the young boy’s devotion to the revolutionary cause he commissioned a statue of the “Faithful Groomsman” to stand in Graves’s honor at the general’s estate in Mount Vernon.
By the time of the Civil War, these statues could be found on plantations throughout the South and like the North Star that pointed fleeing slaves to their freedom, the Lawn Jockey statues pointed to the safe houses of the Underground Railroad. Along the Mississippi River, a green ribbon tied to a statue’s arm (whether clandestinely or with the owner’s knowledge) indicated safety; a red ribbon meant danger. Thus these original lawn jockey statues today fetch thousands of dollars as true artifacts of the Underground Railroad that conducted so many African-American slaves to freedom.
So contrary to most folk’s thinking that these statues as a racial slur they are a memorial to a beacon for freedom!
Often called “The Lawn Jockey,” who was this icon named after?
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Black History Quiz Answer
The 12 year old boy was named Jocko Graves. Similar cast-iron statues began appearing in the decades after Washington’s crossing of the Delaware in jockey silks, whether for aesthetic reasons or confusion born of Graves’s first name.
For further study:
History of the Lawn Jockey Statue jocko graves faithful groomsman
Lawn Jockey Jocko Graves African American Hero Statue
Lawn Jockey Figures & Sculptures for sale | eBay
(Pictured in the Black History Quiz banner above: Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr, Steve Biko, Rosa Parks, Bob Marley, Mae Jemison, The Black Panther Party and George Carver.)
Did you enjoy this issue?
Jim Stroud

Black History Quiz is a weekly celebration of the contributions and achievements of Africans and the descendants of the diaspora in the United States and around the world. PLEASE SHARE this newsletter and help spread the word about a proud people and their cultures. New issues on Sundays at 6:00 pm EST. | www.blackhistoryquiz.com

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