Angel Magazine - Issue #11

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Welcome to Angel Magazine #11. What's on my mind these days? The meaning of friendship, family, winte
 

Angel Magazine

February 17 · Issue #11 · View online
By Angel Trinidad // I am an editor, writer and creative strategist based in Amsterdam, curating the world's most sparkling trends. As Keen On Walls, I present the most inspiring interiors, design and spaces around the world. Angel Magazine is a personal newsletter, a diary of things that inspire me, and make my heart beat faster. // www.keenonwalls.com | www.angeltrinidad.me

Welcome to Angel Magazine #11. What’s on my mind these days? The meaning of friendship, family, wintery songs, Dance Dance Revolution and dreaming of future trips. On this week’s edition, we talk about happiness, resilience, mysterious paintings, caramel wafers, rabbits AND cats. Enjoy!

Projects // Happinez #3
I’m very happy to be part of this wonderful publication! Issue 3 of Happinez magazine is now available in UK stores, and worldwide from 1 March (check out the worldwide store locator). You can also get your copy at the online store. ⭐
Happinez 3 - Let it go — Happinez
Exhibition // Van Gogh Museum's Easy Virtue
Today, I went to Van Gogh Museum’s press preview for its latest exhibition Easy Virtue, an insightful look at prostitution in French art during the late 19th century. It showcases works by Edgar Degas, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Édouard Manet, Pablo Picasso, Kees van Dongen, František Kupka and Vincent van Gogh, among many others.
One of the curators, Dr. Richard Thomson (Professor of Fine Arts at Edinburgh University and an expert on Toulouse-Lautrec) led us on a brilliant tour, explaining the themes behind the paintings. It’s a delight to find the alluded meanings and suggestive clues once you know where and how to look. (“Is she or is she not?”) More than just an exhibition on prostitution, it is an exhibition on the culture of the 19th century - a time of transition, the beginning of mass consumption, and the growth of big cities. It was a new and exciting time which also opened up ambiguities, uncertainty and anxieties in people. 
Check out the beautiful paintings and discover more about this interesting period in history at Easy Virtue.
19 Feb to 19 June
Exhibition Easy Virtue - Van Gogh Museum
Fika with Angel // Lanskroon
Three things I love about Lanskroon tearoom and bakery:
1. They have the most delicious stroopwafels in Amsterdam! Made fresh everyday, their special version is from a family recipe (four generations of bakers!). I love that it is less sweet than the usual stroopwafel, because it’s made not only from caramel but also honey. Super yummy!
2. It is located right by the famous Spui square - a cosy spot to people watch as it is on a corner street. The bakery was founded way back in 1908, and still owned by the same family. It’s teeming with history, frequented by friendly regulars and has a cosy welcoming atmosphere. Can you spot Lanskroon in the photo below? (It’s the corner door with two ladies passing by.) Fika in the early 20th century!!
3. The owner Claudia is a passionate and enthusiastic baker who really cares about her craft (you can tell immediately if you get the chance to meet her). In fact, this love extends to her community. She trains people with disabilities in her kitchen (one of her best bakers is a blind woman), and works together with local baking schools in special training programmes. In addition, part of the proceeds of Lanskroon’s sales go to charity. Thus, you can enjoy a delectable fika while also helping other people. <3
Lanskroon Tearoom, Singel 385 Amsterdam
Lanskroon - ambachtelijk gebak | ambachtelijk leven - Lanskroon
Follow my fika adventures #fikawithangel
#fikawithangel • Instagram photos and videos
Magazines // Poezenkrant
Poezenkrant (Cats’ Newspaper) is one of my favourite magazines. I love that it is about anything and everything about cats (especially the old news, readers’ submissions and vintage ads), irregularly published and always has a different format per issue. 
Beautifully designed (with often blurry and imperfect photos), with a unique sense of humour and a strong DIY ethic, graphic designer Piet Schreuders has been making the zine himself since 1974. It started as a single-page photocopied newsletter about his cat Rode Van Plezier who had kidney stones and had to be treated at the vet’s. They put him in a travel basket, traveled by bus #56 to the vet, Mr. Y. Sharabi, and returned home. Rode was well again. That was it, a simple newsletter sent to 12 friends and colleagues. It snowballed quickly from then on, and now the magazine has over 4,000 subscribers.
I met the publisher himself last week at Stadsarchief’s Poezenkrantmiddag (Cats’ Newspaper Afternoon), and got to chat with him! It was such a delight meeting Piet and getting to know the inspiration and origins of the quirky magazine. He even showed me the first ever issue! (Photo above)
Here is one of Piet’s two cats, Kareltje, who is “extremely intelligent and has an independent, aristocratic demeanor.” He’s helping out with the magazine’s subscriptions. ;) 
You can find out more about Poezenkrant and order a subscription here:
Poezenkrant
Angel loves // FUUKI
Moving on to my other favourite animal: the rabbit. I love Fuuki! My friend Willem (pictured above with his gf Yasmijn and me) has been doodling ever since he could remember - on notebook margins, of chubby-versions of his best friends. Eventually these doodles would evolve into what we know now as Fuuki, an adorable and unpredictable rabbit which Willem illustrates and prints onto t-shirts, bags and sweaters. I personally love the Valentines Fuuki (he’s making out for the first time haha!), the blind Fuuki and the inmate Fuuki. What a rascal! He’s so funny and cute at the same time, and somehow you can sense that this bunny is up to no good. Isn’t it amazing, how simple lines and curves can be so expressive?
Follow Fuuki’s adventures, shop online (free shipping anywhere in the world!) or catch him on weekend markets across Holland:
Home - Fuuki
Achieve // Resilience
“Perhaps most importantly, the resilient children had what psychologists call an “internal locus of control”: they believed that they, and not their circumstances, affected their achievements. The resilient children saw themselves as the orchestrators of their own fates. In fact, on a scale that measured locus of control, they scored more than two standard deviations away from the standardization group.”
“Seligman found that training people to change their explanatory styles from internal to external (“Bad events aren’t my fault”), from global to specific (“This is one narrow thing rather than a massive indication that something is wrong with my life”), and from permanent to impermanent (“I can change the situation, rather than assuming it’s fixed”) made them more psychologically successful and less prone to depression. The same goes for locus of control: not only is a more internal locus tied to perceiving less stress and performing better but changing your locus from external to internal leads to positive changes in both psychological well-being and objective work performance. The cognitive skills that underpin resilience, then, seem like they can indeed be learned over time, creating resilience where there was none.
Unfortunately, the opposite may also be true. “We can become less resilient, or less likely to be resilient,” Bonanno says. “We can create or exaggerate stressors very easily in our own minds. That’s the danger of the human condition.” Human beings are capable of worry and rumination: we can take a minor thing, blow it up in our heads, run through it over and over, and drive ourselves crazy until we feel like that minor thing is the biggest thing that ever happened. In a sense, it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. Frame adversity as a challenge, and you become more flexible and able to deal with it, move on, learn from it, and grow. Focus on it, frame it as a threat, and a potentially traumatic event becomes an enduring problem; you become more inflexible, and more likely to be negatively affected.”
How People Learn to Become Resilient - The New Yorker
#ACHIEVE
That’s it for now! See you in two weeks for new adventures, dreamy stories and cosy fika spots. Don’t forget to call your mom and check up on friends to see how they are doing. Read a beautiful book, visit a cafe you’ve never been before. And remember, you are in charge: resilience is a skill. \o/
Love,
Angel xxx
Curious about my work and projects? Go go go!
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Angel Trinidad (@icehotel) • Instagram photos and videos
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