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Always Be Curious🔎 #16

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As some countries are managing to 'flatten the curve', the debate quickly turns to what comes next. W
 

Always Be Curious🔎

April 12 · Issue #16 · View online
Always Be Curious is your weekly shot of sci-tech coverage. Bringing you the now, the how and the wow of science and technology with a special focus on the chip industry.

As some countries are managing to ‘flatten the curve’, the debate quickly turns to what comes next. When can we return to normal? Can we return to normal? Should we return to normal? Ahead of the key sci-tech coverage that I collected for you this week (Lunar Crater Radio Telescope! 📡 Samsung! 🇰🇷Particle physics! 🧩), I included 3 essays, each with a different perspective on the pandemic and what’s next. Historian Rebecca Spang puts the pandemic in a historical perspective to be able to look ahead. Author Yuval Noah Harari evaluates citizenship, government and globalization. And author Charles Eisenstein reflects on fear narratives.
Have a good week, stay safe and sound,
-S

👨‍💻The round-up in sci-tech💡
The revolution is only getting started (The Atlantic)
Yuval Noah Harari: the world after coronavirus (Financial Times)
“In this time of crisis, we face two particularly important choices. The first is between totalitarian surveillance and citizen empowerment. The second is between nationalist isolation and global solidarity.”
The Coronation (Next Nature)
Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) on the far-side of the Moon (NASA)
“The Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT) would be able to measure wavelengths and frequencies that can’t be detected from Earth, working unobstructed by the ionosphere or the various other bits of radio noise surrounding our planet.”
'Samsung Rising' goes deep on corruption, chaebols, and corporate chaos (The Verge)
We may have spotted a parallel universe going backwards in time (New Scientist)
Why do matter particles come in threes? (WIRED)
Mathematics as a team sport (Quanta)
Mast fire probe amid 5G coronavirus claims (BBC)
‘Ik zag de eerste resultaten, en ik dacht: holy fuck, die tijdlijn’ (NRC)
🤓This week in chips⚠️
After 50 years of effort, researchers made silicon emit light (WIRED)
Samsung Q1 beats estimates; chips likely to prop up virus-hit Q2 (Reuters)
China revving up IC backend equipment development (Digitimes)
📈By the numbers📉
The virus changed the way we internet (The New York Times)
❤️For the love of tech❤️
Avatar robots replace Japanese students for graduation ceremony amid pandemic
WANTS! 'Paper', prototype e-ink display that shows today’s front page: https://onezero.medium.com/the-morning-paper-revisited-35b407822494
WANTS! 'Paper', prototype e-ink display that shows today’s front page: https://onezero.medium.com/the-morning-paper-revisited-35b407822494
Always Be Curious is curated by Sander Hofman, Corporate Communications Manager at ASML. My company provides chipmakers with everything they need (machines, software and services) to mass produce integrated circuits on silicon. Opinions expressed in this newsletter are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.
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