View profile

Always Be Curious🔎 #10

Revue
 
On Monday, NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson passed on to the stars, aged 101. 💫 She was a modest
 

Always Be Curious🔎

March 1 · Issue #10 · View online
Always Be Curious is your weekly shot of sci-tech coverage. Bringing you the now, the how and the wow of science and technology with a special focus on the chip industry.

On Monday, NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson passed on to the stars, aged 101. 💫 She was a modest hero with a remarkable life. Johnson was one of the first ‘computers’ at NASA, back when a computer was a human being. When the first IBM machines were introduced in the early 1960s, astronaut John Glenn insisted that ms. Johnson re-confirm (by hand!) that the computed flight path for his first Earth orbit was indeed the correct one. Later, Katherine Johnson personally calculated the trajectories for the Moon landing by Neil Armstrong and his team in 1969.
As a black woman scientist and engineer, she made more than one giant leap for mankind. So celebrate her modesty, talent and heart for the sciences. Sic itur ad astra! 🌟
Have a good week,
-S

👨‍💻The round-up in sci-tech💡
Katherine Johnson: a NASA trailblazer (NASA)
Shake it, baby! NASA robotic lander confirms quakes on Mars (Reuters)
How to know if artificial intelligence is about to destroy civilization (MIT Technology Review)
You’re likely to get the coronavirus (The Atlantic)
Musicians algorithmically generate every possible melody, release them to public domain (VICE)
Folding glass: how, why, and the truth of Samsung’s Z Flip (The Verge)
🤓This week in chips⚠️
Industrial light and magic - How ASML became chipmaking’s biggest monopoly (The Economist)
We’re not prepared for the end of Moore’s Law (MIT Technology Review)
Google teaches AI to play the game of chip design (The Next Platform)
It’s still early, but potassium batteries are showing promise for grid storage (IEEE Spectrum)
Cryptographic 'tag of everything' could protect the supply chain (MIT News)
📈By the numbers📉
Top 10 breakthrough technologies 2020 (MIT Technology Review)
What happened with LEGO (Reality Prose blog)
❤️For the love of tech❤️
People in China are partying at home via streaming parties due to coronavirus (VICE) People in China are partying at home via streaming parties due to coronavirus (VICE)
Always Be Curious is curated by Sander Hofman, Corporate Communications Manager at ASML. My company provides chipmakers with everything they need (machines, software and services) to mass produce integrated circuits on silicon. Opinions expressed in this newsletter are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.
Did you enjoy this issue?
If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue