View profile

Could bass threaten Yellowstone River trout?

Revue
 
 

Rockies Today

October 23 · Issue #21 · View online
The big stories up and down the Rocky Mountains, curated by Mountain West News

Could bass threaten Yellowstone River trout?
Michael Wright reports on how warming waters could invite non-native smallmouth bass, known to feed on juvenile trout, higher up the Yellowstone River and into the “trout nirvana known as Paradise Valley.” The story’s the latest in the Bozeman Daily Chronicle’s State of Change series, which examines the effects of climate change in Montana.
Bass creep: Could smallmouth threaten the Yellowstone River's iconic trout? Bass creep: Could smallmouth threaten the Yellowstone River's iconic trout?
Smallmouth bass are known to live in the lower reaches of this river but there has been talk of the warm water species inching upstream. The fish are caught somewhat regularly on the Yellowstone downstream of Big Timber. There have been one-offs caught as far upstream as Emigrant — dead center in the trout nirvana known as Paradise Valley.
Some fear climate change is only going to make the famous trout stream more habitable for the non-native predator, which is known to feed on juvenile fish. If bass were to establish upstream, the fish would become another competitor for food and a potential consumer of young trout, adding stress to a cold water species already dealing with making a living in a warmer world. 
More wildlife news:
Once considered a pest, Alberta's official fish is now under threat
Gardiner landowner sues feds to stop bison hunt north of Yellowstone
Idaho resists destroying wolf and elk collar data
Gov. Inslee urges Washington to kill fewer endangered gray wolves
Hunting part of Teton goat eradication plans
Outdoor recreation a staple in Montana's economy
Montana ranks second in the country for how much outdoor recreation contributes to its gross domestic product, according to a Bureau of Economic Analysis report released last month. On Monday, Bozeman-based Headwaters Economics released a visualization of the data.
Report: Outdoor recreation a staple in Montana's economy Report: Outdoor recreation a staple in Montana's economy
Outdoor recreation plays a large role in Montana’s economy, and a recent study from the federal Bureau of Economic Analysis put that role in perspective.
Montana ranks second in the country for how much outdoor recreation contributes to its gross domestic product — 5.1% in 2017. Hawaii ranks first with 5.4%. Maine is third.
The bureau released the report last month. It broke down the data by state and included statistics for the U.S. as a whole. It found that in 2017, outdoor recreation added $427 billion to the nation’s GDP. In Montana, outdoor recreation added $2.4 billion to the state’s GDP, which is just 13% less than what construction added.
On Monday, Bozeman-based Headwaters Economics released a visualization of the data. Headwaters’ executive director, Ray Rasker, has written about rural development and the role of environmental quality for a decade. He sat on a board that guided the Bureau of Economic Analysis research.
Rasker said the report can help Montana understand the return on its investment in outdoor recreation.
“It’s not just a luxury item,” Rasker said. “It’s something that stimulates the economy and creates jobs.”
Much of the Mountain West stands out in the BEA report:
A massive wind farm comes to Carbon County, Montana
Big wind farm expected to bring windfall to south-central Montana Big wind farm expected to bring windfall to south-central Montana
Big wind farm expected to bring windfall to south-central Montana
More on the Pryor Mountain Wind Project:
Construction to begin on wind farm near Bridger after approval
Meanwhile, in Wyoming…
Wyoming wind farm on track to clear another regulatory hurdle
More energy news:
Blackjewel coal miners return to work as new operator sorts out permits
Idaho Power's exit from coal plant lowers customer bills
Leading residential solar company expands Denver headquarters, expects more growth
Can EVs find a home in the Rockies?
'Costs and consequences': Colorado producers adapting to new permitting law
Canadian election stokes sense of alienation in Western oil patch
What else we're reading today
'Everyone deserves to be addressed': Expanding services and voting rights on the Navajo Nation
Rising star builds following on climate action, public lands
Supreme Court won’t halt climate cases against oil companies
In Oregon, the fight for local control upends Western norms
Supreme Court reverses decision on Missoula gun ordinance
Colorado is bad at recycling, so lawmakers spent months looking for solutions. Here’s what they proposed.
Opinion: A bipartisan way forward for American coalfield communities
Rockies Today is edited by Matthew Frank, Fellow in Regional Journalism at the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West at the University of Montana.
Did you enjoy this issue?
If you don't want these updates anymore, please unsubscribe here.
If you were forwarded this newsletter and you like it, you can subscribe here.
Powered by Revue
O'Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, 59812