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PC Gaming Weekly | March 7, 2019

Earlier this week, PC Gaming Editor Jeff Grubb wrote about a chart that gives great context for why g
PC Gaming Weekly

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Earlier this week, PC Gaming Editor Jeff Grubb wrote about a chart that gives great context for why game publishers and studios are focusing so much on live-service games such as Fortnite, Apex Legends, and Rainbow Six: Siege.
Because people play them for days, weeks, and months at a time.
Of course, this is no surprise. These games continue to engage people, and they’re designed so that people come back, day after day. I look at my own habits: Right now, the games I spend the most time with each day are Magic: The Gathering — Arena and Hearthstone, two live-service card games.
The third? Why, it’s Civilization VI, a single-player game. And some days, I play far more Civ than I do anything else. And I don’t just play Civ when new content arrives, though we are on the heels of the Gathering Storm expansion’s February 14 release. I play for stretches that last weeks, sometimes because a modder has posted a cool mod to the Steam Workshop, and other times because I just want a deep, turn-based game to dig into again.
I find myself doing this with a bunch of old role-playing games as well: Every year, I lose several weeks to Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn, Neverwinter Nights 2, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, or Two Worlds II. I spent most of December and January with Final Fantasy XV, a game from 2016 that captured my heart once more.
The concern many face is that single-player games from major studios will disappear as big publishers (and their investors) chase the live-services model, where folks come and pay for cosmetic items, battle passes, and other regular purchases over the $60-per-game model (that may also come with a few $10-to-$20 purchases of DLC and expansions).
But I don’t think this situation is so dire. A number of big companies are committed to single-player games. Folks like Bethesda and CD Projekt Red aren’t going to stop making story-based games. Neither are the smaller “Double A” studios like Obsidian or Ninja Theory that now belong to Microsoft.
My question: When will more of these companies realize that opening their platforms to modding, as Bethesda and Paradox have done, is one way to keep players engaged with single-player games?
For PC gaming coverage, send news tips to Jeff Grubb and guest post submissions to Rowan Kaiser. Please be sure to visit our PC Gaming Channel.
—Jason Wilson, GamesBeat managing editor

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