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Sorrow for Anne, relief for Sieg

NOS 75 years of liberation
A picture that traveled halfway across the world meant salvation for Sieg Monday. A diary that remained in Amsterdam symbolized the death of Anne Frank. In our 47th issue we also pay attention to the children of “wrong parents” and the penalty for camp guard Dey.
“By chance I recieved a diary, a dairy that was written during the war years.” With those words historian Jan Romein started the column A Child’s Voice on April 3th 1946. “When I had finished it, it was night and it amazed me that the lights were still burning, that bread and tea were still available, that the sound of goose stepping boots was absent in the streets. That is how much the reading had captured me and brought me back in time.”
It was the first time that the world heard about the now world-famous book. Otto Frank had received the diary not even a year prior. It was given to him by Miep Gies, who had saved it from the documents that were left lying around in the secret annex after the refugees were taken away. She had wanted to give it back to Anne, but now that her death was confirmed her father became the keeper of his daughter’s legacy.
School photo of Anne Frank, 1940 (collection Anne Frank foundation Amsterdam)
School photo of Anne Frank, 1940 (collection Anne Frank foundation Amsterdam)
Around the same time Keetje Maandag received bad news about her children. According to the Red Cross they had not survived Bergen-Belsen. Desperately searching for more information she received an envelope from a family member from New York. It contained the magazine Life with a picture of her son Sieg, surrounded by death but still alive. With this proof she could be reunited with Sieg and his sister Henneke.
The Allies filmed and photographed the horrors that they found in the liberated camps, proof for the unbelievable stories. These pictures in Life shocked the world. We now know that the picture on which Sieg is shown was altered. The faces of the dead were left out of the frame, naked bodies were covered up. We made the choice to show the original picture.
The original version of the picture in Life
The original version of the picture in Life
At first everyone assumed that the young boy in the picture was German. The picture could there for be seen as a symbol the German nation looking away during the war. Later it was discovered that it was Sieg, who shortly after the liberation of the camp had recieved new clothes. 
Sieg would eventually become an artist, recently his daughter Karen released a book on his life story and work. In it he tells how he as a child experienced living through those horrors. “A child experiences what happens”, is what he said. “Even if something bad happens around them they experience is as ‘this is life’.”
For children of the NSB members the trouble only starts now. “When liberation started, the war started for us.” They lose their parents when they are locked up and reeducated to lose the national-socialist mindset. The subject would leave trauma and taboo for years to come.
An NSB member’s child takes a test
An NSB member’s child takes a test
More carefree is the group of boy scouts that travel across the country this summer. A difficult trip because there is still a travel ban and food scarcity still rules the country. The boys are faced with a country left in ruins. Men that were taken away slowly return to the country, mass graves show the faces of victims, diseases creep around every corner. Even nature does not come out of the war unscathed: inundations, battles and over-exploitation have taken a toll.
In Arhem and Oosterbeek people use the ruins for a special project: the war movie Theirs is the Glory, in which the soldiers who had fought in Market Garden a year prior re-enact their own story.
Theirs Is The Glory
Theirs Is The Glory
In Asia the battle continues. The Americans even dare to launch attack close to Tokyo. No wonder that the Dutch government is already carefully making plans to send troops to the Dutch-East-Indies. It speaks of the “liberation” of this area, of course, not of a “reoccupation”.
War reports
Other messages this week:
The Zwarte Zee (1933)
The Zwarte Zee (1933)
Not on the site
The money that was collected to give the allied soldiers a warm flowery welcome would lead to a tradition in the Canadian capital Ottowa. Even today a tulipsfestival is held every year with thousands of flowers in large flowerbeds in front of the parliament building in the capital. 
Tullips in Ottowa (barnyz – CC 2.0 by/nc/nd)
Tullips in Ottowa (barnyz – CC 2.0 by/nc/nd)
75 years later: WO ll and liberation news from 2020
It was seen as one of the last war cases in Germany. The trail of camp guard Dey (93). Last week he was sentenced to two years in prison. Eventhough most people responsible have passed away by now there are still fourteen cases in preparation by the German DA.
Dey during trial
Dey during trial
Preview
Next week England abruptly says its goodbye to prime minister Churchill, the Canadians make ready for departure from our country and we have a look at the dangers of left-over ammunition for children.
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