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Your Central American Fix

Dear readers, Welcome back to another week of Central American news. I want to thank journalists who
Central American News
Your Central American Fix
By Central American News • Issue #12 • View online
Dear readers,
Welcome back to another week of Central American news.
I want to thank journalists who work tirelessly to report on the region. If you can, send a journalist a warm hug or a word of encouragement. As you know, it’s not a well-paid job (if paid at all!) and it can turn into a dangerous profession. It is done out of passion. Any show of support counts.
In other news: CentAm Curator now has more than 100 subscribers! 🎉 Thank you for caring about Central America and for liking emails :)
As always, I love to hear your feedback. Let’s stay in touch.
Salú,
Melissa

Headlines
🗺️ Guatemala
CICIG: At UN General Assembly, President Morales said that CICIG is a threat to peace // CICIG chief, Iván Velásquez, still forbidden entry in Guatemala despite Constitutional Court ruling
Ixil Genocide Trial: Court declared that genocide occurred during Efraín Ríos Montt dictatorship, but acquitted the only accused in this trial because of insufficient proof
Murder of Juana Ramírez Santiago, member of Ixil Women’s Network
🗺️ Nicaragua
⚡Gov’t repression: 16-year old boy killed in demonstration, allegedly by Ortega forces // Student political prisoner freed after 75 days behind bars
Magnitsky Nica: U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations approved “Magitsky Nica” to enable direct sanctions on Nicaraguan gov’t. Will be debated in U.S. Chamber of Representatives
⚡Miskito Indigenous peoples denounce abuse and land-grabbing and lack of state protection at Inter-American Court of Human Rights
🗺️ El Salvador
War crimes: Confidential documents say U.S. military was aware of planned murder of 4 Dutch journalists in 1982 // Humans rights organization IDHUCA asked prosecutors to investigate on El Salvador military’s role in 2 assassinations and 5 forced disappearances of family in 1982
⚡Thousands marched for water rights, against privatization
🗺️ Honduras
⚡At UN General Assembly, President Hernandez complained about low coffee prices and therefore, wages for coffee producers
⚡ President Hernández laments decrease of U.S. economic aid to Central America and says China’s presence in the region is an opportunity
⚡887 Honduran minors have been reunified with families, 129 are still waiting
🗺️ Panama
⚡ Gov’t defended contract that allows Canadian mining company to invest, despite Supreme Court ruling
🗺️ Belize
UK Armed Forces to continue training in Belize
Taiwan gives Belize $1 million in crime-fighting equipment // U.S. to grant $1 million through CARSI
🗺️ Costa Rica
⚡ General strike against tax reform continues, people demonstrate in the “March of the Cats” // Political dialogue continues
⚡ At UN General Assembly, Vice-President Campbell pleaded international community to mediate in Nicaraguan crisis
Good reads
📰 Anna-Cat Brigida reported on the current state of the political debate on reproductive rights in El Salvador for the Washington Post.
📰A Propublica feature by Hannah Dreier. It’s a thorough reporting on MS-13 gang victims in Long Island and the slow response of local police.
📰 Francisco Goldman tries to understand why the U.S. tacitly supports Guatemalan President for the New York Times.
📰 Guatemala’s military history as seen by Belizean editor, on Amandala. It offers a refreshing perspective.
Fact
Belize gained independence on 21 September 1981 and joined the Commonwealth of Nations. As Queen Elizabeth II is the head of state, it explains why Belize has a prime minister instead of a president.
Photo of the Week
Photo by Victor Peña for El Faro, in Managua, Nicaragua. Extract of his citation (translated by me): "On Wednesday, September 26, members of Nicaraguan civil society - referred to by the local press as "self-convoked" - had prepared a march from the Central American University (UCA) to the United Nations headquarters in Managua. However, as they were surrounded by anti-riot police forces and sympathizers of the Sandinista regime, they decided to turn the march into a 'sit-in'."
Photo by Victor Peña for El Faro, in Managua, Nicaragua. Extract of his citation (translated by me): "On Wednesday, September 26, members of Nicaraguan civil society - referred to by the local press as "self-convoked" - had prepared a march from the Central American University (UCA) to the United Nations headquarters in Managua. However, as they were surrounded by anti-riot police forces and sympathizers of the Sandinista regime, they decided to turn the march into a 'sit-in'."
Let's keep in touch
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