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Society and Technology

Science and Technology Daily Newsletter
Society and Technology
By Carlos Dagorret • Issue #1 • View online
The science of today is the technology of tomorrow.

Radioactive molecules may help solve cosmic mystery of missing antimatter
Researchers design radioactive molecules that might have exceptional sensitivity to the symmetry violations explaining the matter-antimatter imbalance of the Universe.
Physics - Designer Molecules for Fundamental-Symmetry Tests
Nisar spacecraft: major new earth satellite to track disasters, effects of climate change
The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will measure Earth’s changing ecosystems, dynamic surfaces, and ice masses providing information about biomass, natural hazards, sea level rise, and groundwater, and will support a host of other applications. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
The NASA-ISRO SAR (NISAR) Mission will measure Earth’s changing ecosystems, dynamic surfaces, and ice masses providing information about biomass, natural hazards, sea level rise, and groundwater, and will support a host of other applications. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Designed to spot potential natural hazards and help researchers measure how melting land ice will affect sea level rise, the NISAR spacecraft marks a big step as it takes shape.
An SUV-size Earth satellite that will be equipped with the largest reflector antenna ever launched by NASA is taking shape in the clean room at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. Called NISAR, the joint mission between NASA and the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has big goals: By tracking subtle changes in Earth’s surface, it will spot warning signs of imminent volcanic eruptions, help to monitor groundwater supplies, track the melt rate of ice sheets tied to sea level rise, and observe shifts in the distribution of vegetation around the world. Monitoring these kinds of changes in the planet’s surface over nearly the entire globe hasn’t been done before with the high resolution in space and time that NISAR will deliver.
Encased in an icy shell, the ocean on Saturn’s moon enceladus appears to be churning
A pole-to-equator ocean overturning circulation on Enceladus | Nature Geoscience
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Carlos Dagorret

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